**READ THE BLOG POST**

If you’re thinking of creating a product (or products) to sell, where to sell them is something you need to consider. (In fact, I know for most people this is one of the very first things they think about – sometimes even before nailing down the details of the product!)

I’m going to give you a rundown of some of the online marketplaces you might want to consider, my thoughts on who each one is right for and the pros and cons of each.

We’ll cover:

  • Selling on Amazon – including Amazon FBA (2:18)
  • Selling on eBay (17:34)
  • Selling on Etsy (24:05)
  • Selling on Not on the High Street (27:50)
  • Selling on niche sites – such as All By Mama (31:48)
  • Setting up your own ecommerce website (35:05)
  • The importance of building your email list (40:00)
  • Selling on Facebook and Instagram (41:21)

USEFUL RESOURCES

Amazon products requiring approval (UK)

Amazon FBA fee calculator (UK)

All By Mama membership community

All by Mama online store

Book in a Power Hour with me

LET’S CONNECT

If I haven’t answered your question please do get in touch!

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Work with me

Transcript
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Welcome to the, bring your product ideas to life podcast,

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practical advice, and inspiration to help you create and sell

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your own physical products. Here's your host, Vicki Weinberg.

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Hello and welcome. I'm feeling quite chirpy today. Quite possibly

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because I've got two children in school, which is exciting,

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but irrelevant. I know say today, I want to talk

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about where the best places are or where some places

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are to sell your products online. Because if you're thinking

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of selling physical products, the chances are, you've already had

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a think about where to sell them. And in fact,

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I know some people, this is something they think about

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right at the start. Sometimes even before they fought too

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much about the product itself, I get plenty of people

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contacting me. Who wants to say, I want Amazon, for

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example, and then we will talk about that a bit

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later. So what I want to do today is cover

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off some of the places that you can sell your

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products online and talk about the pros and cons of

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each of them.

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And w one was few reasons I want to do

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this one is because I'm going to give you a

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rundown of lots of different places. You can sell your

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products, and I might throw out some ideas of places

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that you haven't even considered before. So for example, my

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products at the moment, and for the last little while

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have done really well on eBay, which isn't a marketplace

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I ever thought about selling them. I just didn't think

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it would be a good fit, but actually it turns

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out that it's doing quite well. So, you know, you

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might get an idea like that. And then the other

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reason I want to talk about some of the places

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that you can sell is because they might or might

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not be a good place for your product, for your

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brand. And just for you because each of these marketplaces,

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while they obviously have upsides, there are some downsides as

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well.

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So I just want to give you a really honest

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of you so that you can start thinking about where,

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which marketplace might be best for you. And as I

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say, perhaps thinking of considering some that you hadn't been

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thinking about already. So the first marketplace I'm going to

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start talking about is Amazon, which is obviously a huge

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one. As I say, I sell my products on Amazon.

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I get lots of inquiries and people wanting to start

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selling on Amazon. And I help them work with a

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lot of Amazon sellers every day. So it seemed like

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the sensible one to start with. And as I say,

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it's a huge marketplace. So according to Google, when I

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looked yesterday, there were over 200 million people visiting amazon.com

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every month.

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And you have to remember, that's huge, but that is

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just one of Amazon's marketplaces because wherever you are in

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the world, but I say wherever, perhaps there are some

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restrictions, but technically you can also sell on all of

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the European sites, which now include the Netherlands and Switzerland.

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You can say on Amazon, Japan, Amazon, China, Australia, Canada,

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Brazil, Mexico, India. I'm not sure how many I've listed,

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but there are 14 in total. So that's a lot

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of marketplaces and obviously some of them are believable, Singapore.

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That's another one I've just thought of, obviously some of

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them are going to be bigger than others, but that's

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a lot of marketplaces and a lot of customers that

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you have access

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To.

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So what kind of product is Amazon best for? So

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you can sell a lot of things on Amazon. Although

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I would suggest doing your research first to check that

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there is actually demand. And I would do your research

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based on the marketplace or marketplaces that you want to

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sell your products because obviously demand is going to vary

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on the different marketplaces. So just because a product sells

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very well on amazon.com, for example, doesn't necessarily mean it

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will sell as well on Amazon in the UK. There

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are some products where competition on Amazon is really, really

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high. So it's gonna be really hard for you to

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stand out or people just wouldn't think of going to

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Amazon to look for those products in the first place

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and there.

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And if you're looking to sell products that fit over

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face categories, I think it's a really hard place to

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start from. If you're wanting to launch really unique product.

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For example, as Amazon is driven by search results. If

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people don't know your product exists, they might not be

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searching for it. So it committed to be really hard

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place to launch. If your product is unique, that doesn't

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mean it's impossible because you can, if you do some

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really good keyword research. So you've got an understanding of

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the kind of things people be searching for if they

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were looking for products similar to yours, or if they

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have problems that will, you know, if you know the

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problems that your product solves, and you have an idea

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of the kind of things people would be looking for,

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you know, if it's, so that problem, you know, you

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can, you can definitely still do really well on Amazon,

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but it is quite a hard marketplace to get started

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on.

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And I personally think it's getting harder all the time,

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simply because they were just more and more sellers joining

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it every day, every week, every month. And if you're

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planning on using fulfilled by Amazon, so that's Amazon FBA

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where Amazon store your stock for you, that can get

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expensive. It doesn't sell fast enough. So if you're not

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sure whether your product is an ideal fit for Amazon,

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but you want to sell on there, I would suggest

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either not using Amazon FBA and fulfilling orders yourself, which

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is a lot cheaper. You can set up, what's called.

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I think I've forgotten what this is called. It's basically

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an individual seller account. What you don't pay a monthly

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fee and you fulfill all the orders you get there

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yourself.

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You do still pay a little fee on each item

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that you sell, or I would suggest sending a small

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quantity of items to FBA. If that's something, you know,

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you definitely want to consider because what you don't want

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to do is have hundreds of items in there that

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you can't sell. And then you, you basically starting curbing

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really big fees, but Amazon to store them. And also

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you get really big fees if you want them to

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send them back to you. So if you're thinking of

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launching a product that you're not sure whether Amazon is

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the right fit or not, that's how I certainly would

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suggest you go about it. Definitely don't go all in

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if you know, if there's a bit of a question

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Mark. So let's talk about some of the pros of

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selling on Amazon. Well, I guess the first one and

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the obvious one is it's a really large marketplace.

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People know Amazon people trust Amazon. I don't know about

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you, but quite often, if I'm looking to buy anything,

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it's one of the first places I go to depending

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on the product, obviously there are things, as I say,

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more unique products. So I was looking this week for

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some prints to go on my son's bedroom. Whoa. And

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I didn't go to Amazon for that. I went to

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a different marketplace. I went to not on the high

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street, which we'll talk about later on, because I felt

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that was the better fit for the kind of thing

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I was looking for. But nine times out of 10,

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if I want to buy anything, I go to Amazon

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and home. Possibly you do to another prey is if

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you decide to use Amazon FBA. So that's again, that's

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fulfilled by Amazon where they handle the logistics. So they

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store your products and they ship them for you.

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And they handle the returns. Okay. There is a cost

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to that, but it does save you time. And it

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does save you having to figure out all the logistics

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by yourself, say there's definitely arts and benefits there. Amazon

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also has a built in algorithm that recommends your products

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to people who might be interested in them based on

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what they've purchased or searched for already. This doesn't happen

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overnight. So if you're a very new seller, you're only

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just on there, this possibly won't happen. But what you

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do you find with Amazon is they reward sales. So

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if your product selling reasonably well, they start showing it

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to more people, which is always nice. And I guess

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you have a pro is the customers are there.

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So you don't need to worry about necessarily about going

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out to find customers. You just need to focus on

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the, customer's been able to find your product because all

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kinds of people shop on Amazon. So it's fairly likely

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that you're quite dependent on, again, it all comes back

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to what you're selling, depending on what you're selling. Chances

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are peop your customers are shopping on Amazon. So it's,

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you know, it's not like you're having to drive them

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to your website, for example, however, they do have to

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find your product when they get there. And then we're

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going to cover that. Now, when we talk about some

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of the, and some of the downsides of selling on

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Amazon. So I guess the first one is, is there's

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a bit of an art to creating an Amazon product

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listing. If your listing isn't well optimized for search results,

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it doesn't sell the benefits of your products rather than

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the features.

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It doesn't have great images. You will struggle to get

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found. And if you'll also struggle with, to convert your

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visitors into sales, I spend a lot of my time

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now helping Amazon sellers I've write or optimize the Amazon

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product listings. If you want any help with this, you

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can get in touch. It's Vicki@tinychipmunk.com because writing an Amazon

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product listing, as I say, is a bit of an

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art. And the quality of listings on Amazon is, is

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getting higher. There's something called Amazon A-plus content now, which

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is where you might've seen extra images and graphics and

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things on listings as a seller. This is brilliant that

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you can take advantage of these of these features, but

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it does mean you have to put a lot of

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work into making sure yours is a listing one that

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gets found in the first place.

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And two that stands out and convert visitors into sales.

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And also on top of all of this, you also

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need to ensure that the listing you create is Amazon

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compliant. There are lots of rules around the photography. There

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were lots of rules around the words you can, and

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can't use no listing. There are character limits, which are

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very strict, and these rules change constantly and often without

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any communication, which is, as you can imagine, pretty frustrating.

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As I mentioned before, for some products and categories, there's

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a lot of competition which can make it harder and

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harder to get initial sales and having Amazon is, and

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with a lot of marketplaces, you need sales to help

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with your ranking because the more so as you make,

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the more Amazon likes you because you're making them more

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money effectively.

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And the more customers you get sold to you get

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shown to so you can make more sales and it's,

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but it's really hard to get sales initially. So I

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usually suggest when you start out paying for Amazon sponsored

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products, which is basically pay-per-click marketing, and the downside here

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is this Tang gets expensive and it obviously is not

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guaranteed to work. It gives you a better chance of

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getting seen in those first weeks and months. And if

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you don't pay for any marketing and you just hope

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you get found organically, I think getting found organically on

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Amazon as a new product where you haven't built up

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any sales history, any reviews is really hard. Amazon sponsored

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products can definitely help with that.

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However, it can get expensive as always. I'd love to

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be able to tell you sort of how much it

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costs. People ask me this quite often, but actually it

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really depends on the product that you're selling on the

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category you're selling in because the cost per click like

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with Google shopping or any other pay-per-click Facebook ads, anything

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at all the cost per click really varies based on

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however many people are competing for that keyword. So, so

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variable it's, it's really hard to say. I would say,

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as a ballpark, you'd be wanting to spend at least

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five pounds a day, possibly 10 pounds in order to

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kind of really get seen in those first weeks and

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months, which is another investment in something.

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If you're looking to sell on Amazon, I think it's

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definitely something you want to be sort of building into

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your, to your budget. So speaking of things that are

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tricky, not all products can be sold on Amazon. So

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I don't think there's many things you can't sell, but

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you know, there definitely are some, and there is actually

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a list buried somewhere that tells you all the products

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that you can and can't sell on Amazon. So if

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you're selling something and you're, you're a bit dubious, so

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actually will they let me sell this, do check the

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list. You also need permission to sell some products and

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to sell in some categories. So I can't give you

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a definitive list here as this changes such a lot,

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and again, without much communication.

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So I'm a coziness at the beginning of October, and

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I know that lots of, so for example, face masks

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at heart to sell on Amazon. Now you need to

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get approval for that. Handwash certainly used to be, I

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don't know if that's still the case supplement to something

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where you need to go through some approvals for some

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products. It's not that you, it's not like you're going

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to get a yes or no as such. It's like,

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they want to see safety data information, and you know,

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other information to prove that your product safe before you

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can list it. So there are sometimes some hoops to

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jump through. And again, I'm not saying this to put

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you off by any means. I just always like to

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be honest with you, and I just want you to

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know what to expect and yeah, definitely don't get pissed

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off.

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I think the thing of Amazon is, and we're going

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to talk about this a bit now is that their

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systems, aren't simple, the seller support, isn't always helpful. So

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it's basically the customer service. The people that help you.

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If you have a problem, the rules when to call

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them rules, guidelines, whatever often change. And as I say,

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little communication, no communication. And my top tips to anyone

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who's trying to get anywhere by Amazon is just persevere

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because I find it takes a lot of perseverance. Get

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your questions answered and your issues resolved. You can ask

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Scott a support or a question and you'll get like

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a, what, what you can basically tell is like a

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copy and paste the answer. Doesn't answer your question and

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you might have to send your original question in again,

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and then you get another copy of, Hey, start and

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start.

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And then you send it in third or fourth or

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fifth time. And finally, someone's answered your question and it,

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it sounds ridiculous, doesn't it? Because if you've ever contacted

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Amazon customer service as a customer, I'm sure you've had

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great Tufts, my service. Well, I always have, I've never

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had a problem as a seller. It's just not the

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same, lots of new sellers struggle with this. And I

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am sure this is one thing that puts people off.

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Because as I say, the system, isn't always that intuitive.

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You know, you can try and add a product list

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in and you've got a problem. So you contact seller

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support to find out why. And you know, you get

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an answer back that maybe doesn't make any sense to

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you. Doesn't answer your question. Lots of people over give

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up or they contact someone like me or another.

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Amazon I'd want to say expert, but I don't call

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myself an expert, but you know what I mean? They

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contact someone. Who's got experience selling on Amazon who can

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help them out. And there are, you know, there are

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those of us out there that can help you. If

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you don't fancy doing it yourself, I wouldn't blame you.

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It's quite a lot to tackle. I've only got, I've

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got two more cons and I'm sorry, it does sound

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like there were a lot of cons of selling on

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Amazon, as I say, it's a great marketplace, but yeah,

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there definitely are some downsides. So the fees can be

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quite high, particularly if you're doing FBA. So that will

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eat into your margins. Something to factor in there is

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a calculator available. And I will put the link to

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this in the show notes actually, cause I think this

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will be helpful, but if you actually, if you type

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in FBA fee calculator, you may be able to find

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it where you can use that tool to work out

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what the fees would be in advance before you sort

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of sign up and commit to anything.

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I think that's useful. One thing just to consider is

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that they will add VAT to what you see showing

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up on the calculator itself. So just bear that in

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mind because that sometimes isn't clear and if you haven't

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added the three 80 into your calculations, then obviously they're

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not going to be that accurate. And then the final

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thing is that Amazon own the customer. So what I

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mean by this is you don't get access to Nate

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as you do. You can't see the name of the

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people who've bought your products, but you don't get email

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addresses and things like that. So if you're trying to

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build up your brands, you're trying to build up your

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own email list that can make it a little bit

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more difficult as we've everything they've always around this. So

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I send follow up emails to everyone who buys off

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me on Amazon, Alyssa, we email and Amazon do allow

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me to put my logo in there.

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So that's quite good. And obviously my logos and my

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product as well, which is good for brand recognition. I

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also put an insert inside all of my packaging, which

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directs people to my website. If they want to take

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a look at more of my products and I've got

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like a freebie, which is a swaddling guide, people can

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get hold of if they would like that. And it's

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only available on my website with email sign up in

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the hope that, you know, some people buy my product

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on Amazon. They'll like what they see. They'll like the

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sound of getting this guide and they'll go to my

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website and give me their email address. Obviously not everyone

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does, but certainly I think more people do than if

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I wasn't offering that. But yeah, you don't get all

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the customer details on Amazon.

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However, and I know that I've just given you a

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huge list of downsides. I do still say it's a

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good marketplace is where I make the majority of my

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sales. And I do think that for some products it

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can, you know, it can do exception you, well, I

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guess my main thing is I wouldn't want that to

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be the only place you sell your products, just because,

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you know, things can go wrong at the moment. For

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example, I'm experiencing an issue where I can't edit any

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of my product listings because some sort of internal Amazon

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era it's been like that for a week. And obviously

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that's a massive inconvenience. So I would, and they can

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kick you off that Sierra thing. You can get your

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listings deactivated for various reasons.

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You just have a bit less control when you don't

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own the marketplace. I've heard people say this about social

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media. You know that it's not your own houses where

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you don't make the rules and you can get kicked

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off. And I feel the same about selling on Amazon

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or any other third party marketplace, if I'm honest. And

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that's why I always advocate for having your own website,

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however basic it might be on top of anywhere else

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that you sell. And we'll talk about your own website

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a little bit later, but the next marketplace I want

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to talk about is eBay. So again, eBay is a

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huge marketplace. There were a lot of people that shop

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there every day. I didn't actually look at the figures

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for this one, but you know, we know it's a

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lot and you have much more control on eBay than

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you do on Amazon.

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So what kind of products is eBay good for? I

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personally think it seems like anything goes, I know that

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you might be thinking, well, actually it's a place for

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used products, but I sit on, as I say, I

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sell new products on there and also refurbished ones, you

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know, ones with a box, you know, box damage and

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stuff that I can't sell this new and both sell,

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but very well on Amazon, I would always suggest research.

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And before you decide to purchase to sell on there,

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not because of sort of money, it doesn't actually cost

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anything to throw up an Amazon listing. I don't think,

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or I don't think you pay unless you sell to

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that's, you know, that's another, that's a plus side, but

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just to save you the time really. So you can

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look at comment listings to see the kind of, if

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people have got a buy now price for listing similar

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to yours product, similar, you can see what that is.

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You can also look up previous, so prices on eBay.

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So you can do quite a bit of free research

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on there to get an idea of what the competition's

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like. And you can list up to 20 items a

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month about face. So I think it's a good place

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to test out your product to see how well it

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sells. And you might find it surprises you so while

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yeah, I would do a bit of research before putting

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something on there just to make sure it's worth your

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time. But actually, you know, it's, it's fairly simple to

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set up a listing. It's not going to take a

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huge amount of time. So it might be one that

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is worth you just going forward anyway, and just seeing

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what happens. So let's talk about the pros, the upsides

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of selling on eBay. So the fees I think are

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fairly reasonable. They're certainly less than on Amazon anyway, although

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they can and do change.

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So depending when you're listening to this, they may or

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may not be as reasonable, but I still think they're

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probably fairly low. There aren't that many restrictions on how

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you present your products at a kind of photography you

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use, how you write your listing, the words you use,

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how you format them, things like that, which makes it

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pretty simple to get a listing up in the first

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place. As I said before, if you don't sell your

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product, you don't pay anything. So yes, you might spend

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some time creating a listing, but you won't have spent

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money on it, which is good. You can. Now this,

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I think this is a fairly new thing. Anyway, pay

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for promotions. Drive traffic to your listings is not that

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expensive. You self set, a percentage fee you want to

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pay.

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Should you get a click from a formated listing? Personally,

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I haven't seen that many results for promotions on eBay

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yet. I've been running them for a couple of months

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and I'm still getting more organic sales, but I guess

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that shows that that's a good thing as well. Obviously

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you still need to be thinking about keywords when you

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sell on eBay. So that's something worth mentioning, probably not

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to the same extent that you do on Amazon. However,

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if you've done research on Amazon into product keywords and

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you know, you've got an optimized product, title and description,

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I would just used the same text for eBay because

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you kind of already know that people are searching for

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those terms on Amazon. Chances are they're going to be

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searching for similar ones on eBay as well.

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And if you haven't got an Amazon listing, but you're

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looking to sell on eBay, I would just do a

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little bit of research on eBay, search for some products

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and kind of see the words that other sellers are

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using for product similar to yours, whatever words they're using

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in the title and the description that you just need

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to make sure you have in yours. So you show

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up. And the other thing I like is since I

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first started selling on eBay, which was a while ago,

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and I'm talking now, you know, just for personal things,

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I've actually noticed that the interface has improved quite a

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lot. It's really easy to navigate some new dashboard features,

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which are quite nice. All in all. I think the

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user experience is pretty good. And in fact, it's probably

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even more on them. I'm aware of is on there.

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There's probably more you can do and more you can

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see. But personally, I think going on, there's quite a

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nice experience. I've never had to contact eBay seller support

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or customer service. I don't know what you call them

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for anything related to selling on eBay. I've just found

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it to be quite a seamless process. And let's hope

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it continues that way. So talking now about the downsides

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of selling on eBay. So the first one is you

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have no control over who else is selling your products,

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what they're charging for them and how they represent you,

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your product, your brand. And I guess you could say

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the same, you know, that you could say the same

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about Amazon, but I guess at least on Amazon, if

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someone else is selling your product and let say, Amazon

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have something called brand sellers.

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So for example, tiny chip monk, my brand is a

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brand. It's a registered brand, have a UK trademark. I'm

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registered as company. If someone else tries to sell my

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products, I can go to Amazon and say, well, look,

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I haven't given anyone else permission to sell my product.

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This is my product. You know, here's all this information

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and they'll kick them off on eBay. You can't do

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that. So it does mean that somebody else could buy

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your product. They could be selling it for what they,

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you know, trying to undercut you, selling it cheaper than

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you. They could be selling used versions and there's nothing

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you can do about it. It's also harder. I believe

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to build a brand on eBay than it is on

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some other platforms, although you can pay for a shop.

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So what I mean here is I think on Amazon,

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you still have the option to make your brands quite

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prominent. Whereas if you buy something on eBay, I'll be

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quite honest. I don't know about you, but I, I,

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I buy a little bit on eBay. I couldn't tell

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you the name of the seller ever. Possibly. I could

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say the brand of the product if I was looking

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for branded products, but if not, if I was just

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looking for a generic product and I bought whichever one

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best fit the bill, I probably wouldn't know which brand

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it was, which comes back to my point about why

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I think it's also good to have your own website.

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So listings expire. So you need to keep on top

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of them. So on some place marketplaces, you create a

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product list and it's there forever. That's not actually the

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case on eBay.

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So you need to think about this. And if you

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hit your listing limit, which varies. So basically this is

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the number of products you're allowed to sell in a

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week in a month. Then you can't create any more

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listings within that month without implying for an increase. And

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if you apply for an increase, that chances are, you

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know, you'll get one, I've never had any problems there,

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but it's just something to be, Oh, way above say

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next market place I wanna talk about is Etsy. So

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Etsy is a marketplace for handmade, originally designed vintage items

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and craft supplies, although that set and that's certainly the

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way the Etsy itself would describe the marketplace. So in

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terms of what kind of products it's best for Etsy,

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a specialized marketplace and your products have to meet, you

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know, a set criteria.

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I've definitely seen products on there though that aren't handmade,

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but are unique. Say for example, digital downloads of clothing

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patterns, I've seen some affirmation cards, definitely printed. I wouldn't

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say they're handmade. They've also been freshly printed. However, they

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are unique products and I'm not sure how well the

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site is policed in that sense, because I believe it

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just used to be handmade products. But given that people

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tend to go there looking for original products, I'd say

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that if your product doesn't fit that category. So if

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you're looking to sell something really generic that you, you

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know, could be on, Amazon could be on eBay, could

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be anywhere. I'd say that Etsy probably won't be the

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marketplace for you.

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There are some plus points stay as they're all marketplaces.

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So if, if you know, you're, if you're selling a

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product that is a good fit for it. See, so

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one of them plus points is that you don't need

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to purchase UPC codes or barcodes sell on Etsy. Whereas

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on lots of other marketplaces, you do need to register

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your products with barcodes to sell there. So as it's

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quite a niche site, lots of businesses will head there

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before we even do an, a Google search if they

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have something specific in mind. So you kind of, you

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know, as with Amazon, you, you know, the customers are,

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are there, it's just a case of them finding your

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product on the site. Say, setting them up on Etsy

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is simple and it's initially free. I've been told that

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it's a really easy platform to use, to create listings,

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edit listings, and just basically to navigate all the feedback

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I've heard from Etsy sellers is it's a good place

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to be.

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And you can sell digital products as well as physics

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core ones. And there were also integrations within Etsy. So

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say you're selling some kind of digital download. You can

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have it set up. So customer orders, the payment's taken

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the downloads emailed to them and you haven't had to

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touch a thing. You know, you set all of that

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up and it's automated. It happens for you, which is

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obviously a really big time-saver. And of course it takes

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some work to set up as these things do, but

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it's quite nice that once it's done, it's all automated

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and does it for you. So some of the downsides

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is that really can only sell a very specific type

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of product. So, you know, this might not be the

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marketplace for you. Well, that's not really a downside though,

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but just a fact, I guess it's becoming quite saturated.

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I believe that there is a lot more competition than

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there was before, but then again, isn't everywhere. I think,

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I don't know. I know so many more people and

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perhaps it's just the circles I move in, but I

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feel like I know so many more people who sell

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products. And I did say five years ago, and as

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I say, it might just be because of who I'm

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sort of engaging with, but I've do believe that all

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marketplaces are, you know, getting new sellers quite a high

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rate. So it's not something that I believe should put

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you off. If you've got a really good product, then

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absolutely go for it. And it can also be hard

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to build that brand awareness is often people know they

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bought something on Etsy, but they don't necessarily know who

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they bought it from.

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However, I have been told by Etsy sellers, I don't

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sit on Etsy, but I have been told by Etsy

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sellers that people do sometimes come back to give lovely

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feedback, particularly if they've bought some sort of bespoke item

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and they love it. They will often still come back

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and, you know, give feedback, give reviews, find, find sellers

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on, on Instagram. So I think that that's not so

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much of an issue as is on some of the

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other marketplaces. Okay. So next I'd like to talk about

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not on the high street. So not on the high

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street is the biggest online gifting marketplace in the UK.

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And there were more than 39 million unique visitors annually.

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And I took that directly from their website. So hopefully

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that's right. So in terms of what kind of product

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it's best for unique and customizable products tend to do

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really well?

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Not on the high street, says it's on the lookout

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for innovative and original ideas and something, a little different.

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So I actually applied to sell on not on the

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high street a while ago. And I'll say while I

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think it was couple of years ago now and they

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turned me down on the basics that a lot of

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my products were well, my put some, my products are

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unique as in then uniquely designed. They wanted them all

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to have the option of personalization and at the time,

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and actually still now there's only one of my products

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that I can personalize it for name on there. And

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I think so that was basically the reason that they

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weren't happy with it. So I think if you're selling

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like a standard out of the box products, unless it's

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exceptionally unique, it might not be the best place for

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you.

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But I think it's a fantastic place for gift items

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is certainly somewhere I go, if I'm looking to buy

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gifts. And I, I think that if you're, yeah, if

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you're in the gifting sort of, if your products in

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the gifting arena, I think that's, there is definitely somewhere

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to consider. And so again, the pros are that you

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can get in front of a lot of customers. It's

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a site people have heard of, it's got a lot

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of credibility, not on the high street, does a lot

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of marketing as well and often features different products and

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brands. And I was about to say, you don't pay

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for that. So you don't directly pay for that. But

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I think he might do indirectly, which I'll talk about

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in a minute. And it tries not to have too

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many similar products on their site, so they won't be

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too much competition.

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This is something that they actually state that they don't

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want hundreds of people selling a very similar product. So

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interrupt for a seller. I think that's a good thing

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because it means there's more, there's less competition for you

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and more chance you'll sell out. So in terms of

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the downsides, as I mentioned a minute ago, not everyone

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who applies to sell here will get accepted. However, I

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will say that if you apply and don't get accepted,

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I said to Nick got really good feedback as to

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why that was the case and what I could do

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if I wanted to get accepted in the future, which

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is really positive. If this is a place you think

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at Joe really wants to be on here, absolutely reach

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out and ask for feedback on what you would need

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to do to make your polo products eligible.

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Because my experience was, they were very happy to actually

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talk to me about that. And the other downside is

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you need to pair setup costs. The last time I

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checked was it was 199 pounds plus VAT, and you

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pay 25% commission, every item sold. So that's quite high.

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That's higher than Amazon higher than eBay, higher than a

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lot of places. I think. So just something to bear

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in mind, obviously, I don't know what kind of traffic

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and sales you would get from being there, but you

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would, I think it's something to consider sort of carefully.

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And something else to mention is recently, I've actually found

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out that if you want to sell on the high

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street, they don't actually want you to have your products

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available on other marketplaces.

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So if you were selling on Amazon, for example, and

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you wanted to turn that on the high street, they'd

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actually want you to stop. So again, if, if you're

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selling on Amazon and you're, you were generating, you know,

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really good revenue every month, you, it would be a

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bit of a gamble. So as I say, none of

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this is of course ever intended to sway you or

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to put you off anything. It's just, you know, get

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you thinking about what might be best for you. And

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of course these rules do can and do change as

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well. So whenever you're looking to get started on any

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marketplace, do go and check out, you know, how they're

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operating now, what the fees are now, what their requirements

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are now, because a lot can change between me recording

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this and you listening.

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So next page, I want to talk about our niche

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websites. So by this, I mean, sites that either specialize

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in a certain kind of product or assess and kind

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of seller, for example, and niche site might be a

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store that sells craft supplies, or it might be a

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marketplace for sellers who are parents, which is actually one

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that I sell on. So if there's a niche website

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that fits your product or fits you as a person

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or you as a business, and it's definitely something worth

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considering the marketplace I sell on is called all by

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mama. So it's a marketplace for products and services actually

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by parents. And I'll link over to that in the

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show notes, in case she wants to go and take

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a look.

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And so there are again, pros to this. So one

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is that visitors to these websites are there as they

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have an interest in products similar to yours. So if

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you are selling craft products and you join a niche

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marketplace, it sells craft supplies. You know, you already have

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a captive audience who want what you have to sell.

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The fees can be lower than on the bigger marketplaces,

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which makes it more affordable. But of course this varies

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across marketplaces. So this is something you need to actually

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look into. Don't, you know, I can't guarantee this will

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be the case sometimes at these marketplaces, particularly if they're

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for type of seller, rather than hyper product also have

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like a community element to it. So as I say

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all by mama, which is one of the ones that

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I sell on by selling on there, you actually met,

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you can actually join a membership.

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So you're connected with other parents who are also selling

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products into this, a really nice community element to that

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as well, which I think has lots of benefits, which,

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you know, I've talked about, have lots of guests, lots

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of podcast episodes. So I won't go into that again

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now, but I do think that's a really nice benefit

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of selling somewhere a bit more niche. And you also

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have a bit more access to the people running the

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site. So this, you know, the service you receive, if

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you have any problems that you need sorting out, I

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think all of that can be better than working with

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somewhere a bit bigger in terms of the downsides. There

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may well be other salads and perhaps lots of other

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sellers selling the same or very similar products to your

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own.

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So you might need to work hard to stand out

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because especially if other sellers have been selling for longer

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than you, they might have built up a bit of

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credibility and some sales history that you won't necessarily have.

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However, that's the case on lots of marketplaces. And again,

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the benefits perhaps of being on a more niche site

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is that, you know, I feel like there might be

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less competition and you might actually be able to help

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each other rather than being in competition. And these marketplaces

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might not be as well known as some of the

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bigger ones I've already spoken about. So they might not

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be the only place you want sell online. If you're

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looking to get lots of traffic, because people might not,

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that might mean necessarily be coming to these website as

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often as they are to some of the bigger ones

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like Amazon eBay, norm high street.

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However, if as I say, because they are a bit

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more niche, it might be that yes, less people are

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visiting them, but the people that visited them are, you

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know, they're, they're more of your ideal customer and they've

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actually visited them with an intent to purchase rather than

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just browsing. So all of this is things that I

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can say, okay, the next thing he wants to talk

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about is having your own website. And if you want

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to grow your brand, your customer base, your email list,

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I think having your own e-commerce site is a really

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good option for you. I actually think that all brands

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should have one. Even if you think you're going to

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make most of your sales elsewhere and in terms of

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what kind of product is best for or anything, I

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mean, it's, your site is yours.

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I mean, you have total control, which is the first

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probe I want to talk about. I mean, you have

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complete control of the look and feel of your site,

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the content of your site, the photography style of your

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site, abstain, everything, because it's yours. There are lots of

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user-friendly e-commerce website builders that you can choose from. Now.

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I actually use Shopify, which I really like. It was

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really simple to set up really easy, to get it,

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to look how I wanted it to look. I didn't

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have to do any code or anything like that, but

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actually, maybe I did a little bit for something, but

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you know, there are lots of apps that integrate with

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it and you can, you can do a lot without

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having, you know, just clicking buttons and filling in fields.

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Basically, if you're a bit daunted by the thought of

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building your own site, depending how you decide to fulfill

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your products, you might find that some of the sites,

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the ins, the inventory can also integrate with our channels.

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So Amazon, eBay, and other marketplaces. So you can control

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your stock from one place. Shopify certainly does this. I

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really like it because everything's sort of sinked up. You're

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in complete control of your cross because there are no

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hidden fees. You're not going to pay referral fees or

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anything like that. So you're going to set your own

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prices. You're going to set your own shipping costs and

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you're, you know, you're much more control of your margins.

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And of course, if you want to drive more traffic

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to your site, then you can use things such as

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Google shopping to do, which you can't do to Amazon

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or anything else that you, for example, you can set

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up a Google shopping campaign linked to your Amazon listing,

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but you can to your, to, to, to a listing

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on your main website and equally, if you don't want

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to have any commerce website, you just want to have

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a website with a bit of brand awareness.

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You can link from your own website, which could be

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a really simple, even a one pager. You could link

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free to your Amazon listing. You're not on the high

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street listing or wherever it is. You want to direct

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people to make the actual sale space. If you're in

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control of everything, which is nice. And also you own

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the customer details. So what I mean by this is,

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as I said before, places like Amazon keep the information

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from you. You know, you're never going to get a

Speaker:

customer's email address from Amazon, but if someone buys from

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you on your own site, you get their email address

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and other contact details. So it's basically, it's a nice

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way of building up your email list and your followers,

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right? So let's talk about some of the downsides of

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selling on your own website.

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So, first one is, if you're building a website from

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scratch, you will have to do a bit of work

Speaker:

to actually get traffic to your website in the first

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place. So SEO or search engine optimization is important and

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you will need to work hard initially to get people

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onto your site. So wherever you do that organically by

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SEO, wherever you do Facebook ads or Instagram ads or

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any, you know, Google shopping or any kind of ads

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to get people over there, you may not have to

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do that, but it's an option. Or you may choose

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to just rely on really good SEO, really good content,

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but it's definitely not a case of building a website

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and, you know, hundreds people turn up with their credit

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cards. It just doesn't happen. People have to actually be

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able to find you, which is a little bit harder.

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They don't maybe know that you're there. You will also

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have to pay for a domain and usually also a

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monthly fee for whatever platform you're choosing. So for example,

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if you want to use Shopify, there are different monthly

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packages, depending where exactly you want to sell. So there's

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like a basic package. And then they sort of tid

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upwards depending on the features that you need. And then

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of course you pay for your domain fee. So for

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my case, that's tiny chipmunk.com. So I pay, I use

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GoDaddy for my hosting. I paid them for that domain.

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And then I pay Shopify a fee for actually having

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the actual website. So just something to consider and setting

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up your own website is a bit of a commitment

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in terms of time and the cost.

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So just that's how does I say just the fact

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of him, because presumably once you set up your vain

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website, you're going to have it forever, or at least

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for the lifetime that you're selling your product so that

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you know, that hosting fee, wherever that is, and that

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monthly fee or annual fee for having a website, that's

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going to be like an ongoing cost that doesn't disappear,

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but it's not something you pay once. And then you're

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done. You're going to be paying that consistently. So that's

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just something to bear in mind. I don't think any

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of these things you put you off, I really think

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that having your own e-commerce store or, or even if

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you don't want an e-commerce store, a very basic website

Speaker:

of just brand information, although ideally an e-commerce store I

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think is, is, you know, I think you really need

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to have it.

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And I also think you need somewhere on that store

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or website where you can capture people's email addresses. So

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of course you can do that checkout. So if someone

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buys from you, you get their email address and you

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can sort of building up an email list. And if

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you, you know, you can also do, as I do

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and offer some kind of freebie, maybe it's some sort

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of download like my thought-leading guide, or perhaps it's even,

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you know, a percentage discount. If somebody buys, you know,

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signs up to your email list, I do think is

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worth having. And I know I've been saying as a

Speaker:

few times, I just, just briefly explain the reason I

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think you need an email list is say that when

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you launched your products or you have a sale, you

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know, you've got products you want to not get rid

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of, but you know, you want to sell off a

Speaker:

bit quicker, or maybe you want some feedback from your

Speaker:

customers on, should I offer this product in this color

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or that color, whatever it might be.

Speaker:

You've just got an audience of people that you can

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tell and ask and engage with. And yet of course

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you can do that on social media, but like anything

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you don't own your social media platforms, you could inferior,

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I suppose, get thrown off them. I don't really know

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if that happens. Hopefully it never happens to any of

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us, but it could. Where is your website? Your email

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list is yours and you've got a complete control. And

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I really think that's something that's important. So the final

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platform or marketplace I want to talk about is selling

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on Facebook and Instagram, which is one that you may

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or may not have considered before. But if you have

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a business Facebook page, you know, this client, you can't

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do this on your personal site.

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It has to be a business page. You may or

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may not know that you can add a shop and

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you can sell your products directly on Facebook. And on

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Instagram, you can tag products into your posts and then

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a customer can click through to buy them on your

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website or wherever you want them to click through to.

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So it's basically me makes Facebook and Instagram quite shoppable.

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So in terms of what products this is best for,

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I guess, most things I think Facebook, do you have

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rules around what you can and can't sell, and you

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can obviously go and check these out. So the plus

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sides for doing this is it's free. There isn't a

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fee involved in doing this. There might be a fee

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involved in the actual product setup.

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If, for example, in my case, I have a Shopify

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site and I have to pay for a different Shopify

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package because I want to use Facebook shops. So basically

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I want my Shopify sites integrate with Facebook. So I

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don't have to set up the Facebook shop as a

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separate entity. It's all tightly to my site and it

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all just integrates. And I have to manage everything in

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one place, which I like automation. And you can't tell

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already. And that's my, one of the other pros I

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wanted to mention is that many eCommerce platforms do integrate

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with Facebook, which means you only need to set up

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and manage your listings in one place. And it also

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means that customers can browse and buy in one place

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without having to go to a separate website. So you

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can run Facebook ads to your Facebook shop or Instagram

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ads to your Instagram shop so that people can buy

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within the platform.

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And certainly at Juven Instagram, even if people click on

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a shoppable paste or an ad and they go through

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to buy your products, it goes through to your website,

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but the website actually opens up within Instagram. So in

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the same it's browser window. So I think that's quite

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nice as well. Sometimes people don't want to leave wherever

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they are to go and buy something in terms of

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the downsides. So, as I mentioned before, you'll need a

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Facebook business page. It sets up a shop in Facebook

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and you'll need an Instagram business account with a connected

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business Facebook page, if you want to sell there. So

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that might also sound hope. It doesn't sound too technical.

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I think it's fairly straightforward. I sat and he managed

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to get mindsets up without too many issues, or I

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do know that people do, but I do think, you

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know, this is probably something that you can get a

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little bit of help on if needed.

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I find that it's actually quite hard to get engagement

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on Facebook. Now, I don't know if anyone else had

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an experience. I certainly do. So I guess one thing

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you might want to think about is if you, weren't

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already thinking of setting up a Facebook page for your

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business, if you know, if Facebook isn't a channel you

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use, wasn't when you, you're planning to use, you have

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to think about whether you want to, or maybe you

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have the time to keep up with a social media

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channel because you don't really want to have a business

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Facebook page where shop on it. If that's the only

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content, I honestly don't think people, I could be wrong

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here, but I don't think anyone's particularly going to be

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happy to hand over their money and buy from a

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page. That's just got a shop and absolutely, you know,

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nothing else on there. Unless of course, maybe you have

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a link free to, you know, your business website, which

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has a bit more information.

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And I think it's also, probably not the only place

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you'd want to be selling because unless you've built up

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a good following and a good reputation, I don't know

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how likely is it. Someone will buy something from someone

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they've never heard of on social media. I think I

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could be proven wrong. And in fact, I bought something

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off a company on Instagram the other week that I'd

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never heard of. So perhaps I'm, I'm completely contradicting myself,

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but then again, they had lots of social proof. So

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they had an Instagram page with like 30,000 followings followers,

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you know, and a bit, you know, they had a

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website that I went through to where you could see

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reviews. They want Trustpilot I guess what I'm saying is

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if you're first starting out, this sort of thing might

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be a little bit harder.

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And again, that's not to put you off of that,

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putting you off is never, ever my intention with any

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of this. I just want to make sure that you

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think through what you're doing because you know, whatever marketplace

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or marketplaces you decide to sell on, it's an investment

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of time and probably a bit of money as well.

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And so I think that, you know, I just want

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you to have think about everything that I've said, and

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then before deciding which marketplaces are right for you in

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which you're going to go ahead with, I think you

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also don't do need to go and do a bit

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more research on your own. So I think this episode

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is hopefully a really good starting point to give you

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some ideas of the places that you could sell that

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might work for you for your products and how you

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want to on your business.

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And you can now go and have a look at

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them forever in the block paste. For this episode, I've

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also put lots of links to information about selling on

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various marketplaces. So some of them are links to posts

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on my own website where I've had experience selling somewhere,

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and I can actually talk from experience and share some

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best practice and hints and tips and things like that.

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And some of the links are to, you know, help

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pages for various sites designed to help you get started.

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There also remember that it's definitely possible to sell in

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multiple places. It's also possible to try something and see

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if it works and stop. If it doesn't, you're assuming

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you haven't put in too much investment, that is, and

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if you're feeling unsure or perhaps overwhelmed after this episode,

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first of all, no, that's not my intention.

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It's never my intention. This is quite a long episode,

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but I wanted it to be quite comprehensive. I just

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wanted to give you lots of, you know, honest information

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and realistic as well. I think I'd always want to

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be, you know, be realistic with you and honest so

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that you can think about where you want to take

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this next. But if you are feeling really overwhelmed, I

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would suggest picking one pump marketplace plus your main website.

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Because again, I think every brand should have their own

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website and start there. The thing is you can always

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add in more channels as you go. So at the

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moment I think I sell on about, well, I think

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I sell on about six different marketplaces. There were ones

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that I haven't mentioned. So I sell on of for

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sustainable products, for example, that didn't all happen overnight.

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I started off just selling on my own Shopify store

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and on Amazon, I then sort of over time, started

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to sell in other places. There were some marketplaces that

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I sold on a few years ago that I don't

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sell on now, simply because, well, for various reasons, I

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don't think it's worth continuing. And you just, you know,

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you can stop things any point. I think the main

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thing is that you start somewhere. So I would pick

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a marketplace that sounds good to you. That would be

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a good fit for your products over then do some

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more research into it to see if it, you know,

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if it is a really viable option and then just,

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you know, get, get started there and remember that you

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can change, stop and change at any point. So I

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really hope the episode was helpful.

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I'm aware that it was a long one. There was

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a lot of content. It might be one. Maybe what's

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come back and listen to maybe a time when you

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can take some notes. As I say, there is a

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very detailed blog post to go alongside this as well,

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which covers everything we spoken about if you prefer that

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format. So as always, thank you so much for being

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here, please do remember to rate, review and subscribe to

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the work to the podcast and tell all your friends

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we'll thank you so much. I'm gonna look forward to

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seeing you next week, where I have another fantastic interview

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to share with you and until then take care and