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Kinga Hoffman is the founder of House of Culture in Brighton, a creative collective connecting communities across Brighton through art, culture, and wellbeing. The House of Culture hosts sessions, workshops, and events for all.

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This podcast is a little bit different. I know many of you have creative and handmade businesses, and today I thought it’d be interesting to talk a bit about the creative process. Why is being creative so good for us and our well-being?

The perfect guest to talk to this about is Kinga Hoffman, founder of the House of Culture in Brighton. Kinga creates space and opportunities to discover, enjoy and experience art. Kinga believes that everyone is creative and art is fundamental to human expression.   

So even if you don’t consider yourself to be creative, or struggle to find a creative outlet, Kinga is here to inspire you, as she passionately explains that creativity is something we all have within us, and share some suggestions of things you can do that are creative.

Listen in to hear Kinga share:

  • An introduction to herself and her business (01:46)
  • Her previous career and how she came to open the House of Culture (03:21)
  • How creativity provides a slower-paced alternative to modern life (13:06)
  • The benefits of being creative (18:42)
  • We are all creative (23:07)
  • How to add creativity into your life again (24:41)
  • The link between creativity and wellbeing (29:26)
  • Her own creative outlets (30:53)
  • How you can get creative at the House of Culture (34:47)

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Transcript
Vicki Weinberg:

Welcome to the, Bring Your Product Ideas To Life podcast, practical

Vicki Weinberg:

advice, and inspiration to help you create and sell your own physical products.

Vicki Weinberg:

Here's your host Vicki Weinberg.

Vicki Weinberg:

Hello.

Vicki Weinberg:

Hope you've had a really good week.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, we've got a bit of a different episode for you today.

Vicki Weinberg:

It's coming up to the end of the year and I thought it might be quite

Vicki Weinberg:

nice to do something different.

Vicki Weinberg:

So I know that lots of you have creative and handmade businesses.

Vicki Weinberg:

And today I thought it'd be really nice to talk a bit about the creative process.

Vicki Weinberg:

Being creative in general, why it's good for us?

Vicki Weinberg:

Why it's so good for our wellbeing?

Vicki Weinberg:

And if anyone listening, who doesn't consider themselves creative, or

Vicki Weinberg:

maybe doesn't have a creative outlet to give you some suggestions of

Vicki Weinberg:

things you can do that are creative.

Vicki Weinberg:

And of course, um, some of the creative things we do might lead to having

Vicki Weinberg:

something that you want to sell or turn into a business, but actually for

Vicki Weinberg:

lots of people that just never happens.

Vicki Weinberg:

I talk in this episode about the fact that I crochet, actually, I'm never

Vicki Weinberg:

going to make a business around that.

Vicki Weinberg:

It's just something I do for fun, but that's great for all of the reasons

Vicki Weinberg:

we're going to talk about today.

Vicki Weinberg:

So today I'd love to introduce Kinga Hoffman.

Vicki Weinberg:

So Kinga creates a space and opportunities to discover, enjoy, and experience art.

Vicki Weinberg:

She believes everyone's creative and that art is fundamental to human expression.

Vicki Weinberg:

So she's going to talk to us about her business and what she does, um,

Vicki Weinberg:

which I found absolutely fascinating.

Vicki Weinberg:

The history around why she started and then we're going

Vicki Weinberg:

to talk all things, creativity.

Vicki Weinberg:

So I really hope as always you enjoyed this conversation and, um, yeah,

Vicki Weinberg:

I'd love to introduce you to Kinga.

Vicki Weinberg:

So hi Kinga, thank you so much for being here.

Kinga Hoffman:

Uh, hi Vicky.

Kinga Hoffman:

Thank you very much for having me.

Kinga Hoffman:

And, um, yeah, I think I need to introduce myself a little bit.

Kinga Hoffman:

So, um, my name is Kinga and I run a, um, um, place called House of Culture.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, and, uh, yeah, this is the place where you can experience art.

Kinga Hoffman:

When you can come back to art where you can discover art, when you can

Kinga Hoffman:

do all sorts of different things, connected to us and wellbeing.

Kinga Hoffman:

And this place is based in Brighton.

Kinga Hoffman:

We a one year old.

Kinga Hoffman:

And, um, yeah, we looking forward to the more adventures and, um,

Kinga Hoffman:

new people that they're going to come and experience art with us.

Vicki Weinberg:

Oh, I didn't realize you were only a year old actually.

Vicki Weinberg:

Wow.

Vicki Weinberg:

So you've had, you've had quite a tricky first year then I guess.

Kinga Hoffman:

Yes, that's.

Kinga Hoffman:

That's uh, that's actually, it's quite interesting because when I don't

Kinga Hoffman:

remember that, I mean like somehow my brain, um, shut down, but, um, whenever

Kinga Hoffman:

people like yourself finds out that we are just one, you know, they're like,

Kinga Hoffman:

wow, you opened during the lockdown.

Kinga Hoffman:

And I'm like, yeah, actually I did.

Kinga Hoffman:

I did open during the lockdown.

Kinga Hoffman:

And, um, um, somehow it was the right time.

Kinga Hoffman:

I mean, um, if locked down and the pandemic wouldn't happen, then

Kinga Hoffman:

probably, maybe I would not open at all.

Kinga Hoffman:

So it's, um, you know, it's a silver lining of our situation at this moment

Kinga Hoffman:

that I, I decided to change my career completely and, and open something totally

Kinga Hoffman:

different than I used to work with.

Vicki Weinberg:

Okay.

Vicki Weinberg:

So I am really intrigued.

Vicki Weinberg:

Now, would you mind telling us that story about your, maybe if you want to talk

Vicki Weinberg:

a bit about your previous career and then how you came to House of Culture.

Kinga Hoffman:

Long, long story short is I'm, uh, I presume you will, yourself

Kinga Hoffman:

and other people realize already I'm not a native English speaker, so I'm,

Kinga Hoffman:

I'm from Poland and, um, the whole.

Kinga Hoffman:

Whole life happens, um, in Poland but when I was about 10 years old, I've been

Kinga Hoffman:

introduced by my friend to the place that we call in Poland House of Cultures.

Kinga Hoffman:

And basically the place is, um, is the place where you

Kinga Hoffman:

can experience many things.

Kinga Hoffman:

Aspects of art and expression.

Kinga Hoffman:

So you can go to the classes where you've got an art.

Kinga Hoffman:

You can go to the classes, we've got a cooking, you can

Kinga Hoffman:

go to their language classes.

Kinga Hoffman:

They're not like a class session, so it's afterschool activities and

Kinga Hoffman:

you can go and have a type of shift.

Kinga Hoffman:

So the whole idea is to try as many things as possible before you kind of

Kinga Hoffman:

release yourself into the grownup world.

Kinga Hoffman:

Why I'm talking about this, when you ask me about my career is because

Kinga Hoffman:

that's somehow had the impact of my, uh, on my grown up life.

Kinga Hoffman:

Uh, because I started going there and I was going first to the

Kinga Hoffman:

pantomime class pantomime session.

Kinga Hoffman:

Then I went to the, macrame session and then I eventually ended up in

Kinga Hoffman:

the art sessions somehow that, um, decided about my life as a grownup

Kinga Hoffman:

person, because then I decided to study interior architecture in Poland.

Kinga Hoffman:

And then I become an interior architect, which obviously it's very

Kinga Hoffman:

glamorous in a, in a description.

Kinga Hoffman:

Everyone, when I say I'm all I'm going to tell you, architecture is something

Kinga Hoffman:

slightly different than design.

Kinga Hoffman:

Quite similar and everyone was like, wow, that's absolutely fascinating.

Kinga Hoffman:

You're doing amazing stuff.

Kinga Hoffman:

It is great job.

Kinga Hoffman:

Don't get me wrong, but.

Kinga Hoffman:

It has a, as a, kind of like a boring side to it as well, and kind of

Kinga Hoffman:

dealing with money and people and other people sub-contractors building sites.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's not exactly as glamorous as it seems to.

Kinga Hoffman:

Uh, anyway, it's, it's been my job for about 15 years.

Kinga Hoffman:

Yeah.

Kinga Hoffman:

And then Ireland cause I used to live Ireland before.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, and, and it was, it was good.

Kinga Hoffman:

It was brilliant.

Kinga Hoffman:

You know, it's, it's a creativity at the highest point.

Kinga Hoffman:

You know, you are creative in this job as much as you can be.

Kinga Hoffman:

And you are, you designing the layout to moving the walls.

Kinga Hoffman:

You decides about extensions, every aspect of this job.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's really, really interesting, but at some point, and I think it's after

Kinga Hoffman:

I become a mom, I realized that okay.

Kinga Hoffman:

Brilliant, but I would like to do something more for others.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, you know, and more kinds of for kids related.

Kinga Hoffman:

I somehow found out that being with kids is, is it really easy

Kinga Hoffman:

for me and actually grown up life?

Kinga Hoffman:

Being adult is overrated.

Kinga Hoffman:

I'm really sorry.

Kinga Hoffman:

But I think the most important thing is when we are kids and I

Kinga Hoffman:

have some other kids and, um, the way how they look at life, the way.

Kinga Hoffman:

Uh, constantly curious and asking the questions.

Kinga Hoffman:

And I know sometimes we've got enough of those questions and sometimes we think

Kinga Hoffman:

like, oh my God, stop asking another why?

Kinga Hoffman:

Because, but actually that's the, that's the creativity at the highest point as

Kinga Hoffman:

well, because they want to know why, how, and, and, you know, that's kind of gave

Kinga Hoffman:

me an idea about opening the place for the kids, where they could experiment with.

Kinga Hoffman:

Try and new things.

Kinga Hoffman:

Obviously the reality at this moment is that I've got on the app, like

Kinga Hoffman:

the class because, um, different reasons, mostly money-wise and,

Kinga Hoffman:

and, and, and lot of dance as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

But, uh, yeah, the other, the other reason, the reason about opening the

Kinga Hoffman:

spaces that we are now, the political situation, I had no one to kind of moan

Kinga Hoffman:

and rant about it, but, you know, kids having less and less creative subjects at

Kinga Hoffman:

schools, that's down to the curriculum.

Kinga Hoffman:

And it's quite ironic for me because creativity is the most sought after

Kinga Hoffman:

skills in the, in the grownup portworld

Kinga Hoffman:

after that, like we need to be creative and every aspect of

Kinga Hoffman:

life, someone says that we're not creative or I'm not creative.

Kinga Hoffman:

They are not aware about their own creativity, basically.

Kinga Hoffman:

So that's, that was the main reason why I opened the space.

Kinga Hoffman:

And at this moment, uh, we've got a small place on the orange row.

Kinga Hoffman:

Uh, it has orange though because orange is my favorite color.

Kinga Hoffman:

And this is the place where kids come after school or during the day, if

Kinga Hoffman:

they home educated on Saturdays, they can try different techniques of art.

Kinga Hoffman:

They can relax, they can swing on the swings cause we've got to

Kinga Hoffman:

swing some big popular, um, and they can be together as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

Cause you know, we have.

Kinga Hoffman:

You know, the places where we live are different.

Kinga Hoffman:

Some people are having a very small flats.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's impossible to have a couple of kids at the same time.

Kinga Hoffman:

So, you know, the various aspects of my place, it's not only an

Kinga Hoffman:

art and it's not a place where I'm going to tell you what to do.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's just the place.

Kinga Hoffman:

You come in and you can try and I'm here only to help.

Kinga Hoffman:

So sorry, I kind of make a, I made a whole way around, but, uh, yeah,

Kinga Hoffman:

that's why House of Cultures is, my new career now, and it's absolutely

Kinga Hoffman:

dream job and I absolutely love it.

Vicki Weinberg:

Well, thank you for that.And no you didn't,

Vicki Weinberg:

you didn't go round at all.

Vicki Weinberg:

I think I was, I found your story so fascinating.

Vicki Weinberg:

And yet I loved having hearing that because I know we'd had a quick talk

Vicki Weinberg:

before but I purposefully didn't go into the, some of these questions because I

Vicki Weinberg:

wanted to hear them for the first time on the podcast, as well as everybody else.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, but one thing that struck me is I didn't realize just how new it was.

Vicki Weinberg:

So the House of Cultures in, you mentioned in Poland was that

Vicki Weinberg:

some things I'm just curious.

Vicki Weinberg:

Was that like just one particular place that you went to, or was that part of the

Vicki Weinberg:

culture overall in Poland that children would have access to these activities?

Kinga Hoffman:

To be honest with you, I think it's a kind of like a

Kinga Hoffman:

thing that came from the communist, uh, politics and communities bloc

Kinga Hoffman:

that Poland used to belong to.

Kinga Hoffman:

And I I'm sure that they had them in Russia and the part of Soviet Republic.

Kinga Hoffman:

Then that as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

So it's not like, you know, it's a kind of like one thing now it's been

Kinga Hoffman:

pretty much in every small city.

Kinga Hoffman:

Like I K I, I came from the quite big town, those, you

Kinga Hoffman:

know, 450,000 people there.

Kinga Hoffman:

So, um, and we had quite few of those in the city.

Kinga Hoffman:

I just went to the one that was closest to my, to my house,

Kinga Hoffman:

to place what I used to live.

Kinga Hoffman:

So, um, I mean, it, it's, it's a brilliant, it's so

Kinga Hoffman:

simple and it's brilliant.

Kinga Hoffman:

You've got a different.

Kinga Hoffman:

Activities under one roof and the kids can come and do, um, and try, I mean,

Kinga Hoffman:

like it's so simple, you know, because I always think like, especially, you know,

Kinga Hoffman:

now being a grown-up person, like how you.

Kinga Hoffman:

can how, you can decide what to doing others' life.

Kinga Hoffman:

If you haven't tried.

Kinga Hoffman:

I mean, like, of course we've got imagination, you've got ideas.

Kinga Hoffman:

Like, okay.

Kinga Hoffman:

I would like to be a doctor because my mom is a doctor and

Kinga Hoffman:

I kind of see what she does.

Kinga Hoffman:

Perfect.

Kinga Hoffman:

But what if the imagination, doesn't kind of cover the reality.

Kinga Hoffman:

And then, you know, at some point you're going to the university putting

Kinga Hoffman:

all that effort to do all the steps, to be a doctor, for example, a lawyer.

Kinga Hoffman:

And then you realize actually, that's not exactly how I envisage that.

Kinga Hoffman:

So, um, and especially with creative subjects, it's I think

Kinga Hoffman:

it's important to check what really.

Kinga Hoffman:

Your passion or what really makes you not even know what's already is your passion.

Kinga Hoffman:

No, it's a wrong way around what makes you happy basically, because, you know,

Kinga Hoffman:

as you know, and it's cliche, but in life, we, we looking for the happiness.

Kinga Hoffman:

So if something makes you happy, that's the most important thing.

Vicki Weinberg:

Absolutely.

Vicki Weinberg:

And I think you're right in that, that even if it's so not something you want

Vicki Weinberg:

to do necessarily for job or career, I think making you happy is really

Vicki Weinberg:

important because I think like over the last couple of years, with the,

Vicki Weinberg:

you know, the lockdowns and spending more time at home, I know there was a

Vicki Weinberg:

link between people try more art and creative things like I started doing.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, cross-stitch for example, because I was looking for something

Vicki Weinberg:

creative and years before I taught myself how to crochet.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, but it's actually, I think a bit harder to pick some of

Vicki Weinberg:

these things up as an adult.

Vicki Weinberg:

If you see what I mean, I found it so hard to teach myself to crochet was

Vicki Weinberg:

such a tricky process because it was something I'd never done as a child.

Vicki Weinberg:

I went to lots of things as a child.

Vicki Weinberg:

I was very lucky, but I never.

Vicki Weinberg:

I don't feel like I did many of these creative things perhaps.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, so I can definitely see the benefits of doing it as a child.

Vicki Weinberg:

Cause sometimes as an adult, it can be a bit daunting to pick

Vicki Weinberg:

up and try and do something new.

Kinga Hoffman:

I think that actually it's in our head because to be honest with you.

Kinga Hoffman:

For me, crochet and cross stitches is a black magic.

Kinga Hoffman:

I tried to do some crocheting, and it was when I was a kid.

Kinga Hoffman:

And then as you said, I did exactly the samewhen lockdown happened.

Kinga Hoffman:

I said like, okay, what we can do at home.

Kinga Hoffman:

I don't need to have a lot of supplies, you know?

Kinga Hoffman:

Okay.

Kinga Hoffman:

crochet and don't get me wrong.

Kinga Hoffman:

I can do basic staff, but.

Kinga Hoffman:

You know, it's, it's difficult.

Kinga Hoffman:

And I think the biggest problem in our lives at this moment is

Kinga Hoffman:

that we tend to live so fast.

Kinga Hoffman:

Like I tend to call our time of our lives.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's a kind of like a fast, fast Amazon prime times.

Kinga Hoffman:

Basically we, we believe and social media are not helping with that as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

That things are happening immediately by the press of the button.

Kinga Hoffman:

And what's even more interesting that the kids getting the same ideas already,

Kinga Hoffman:

that, you know, you watching a movie on a YouTube how to do the painting.

Kinga Hoffman:

And the lady is doing a painting in 30 seconds, like, excuse me,

Kinga Hoffman:

but it's not happening this way.

Kinga Hoffman:

And coming back to your crochet thing as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

I know it sounds difficult and I know thing, but the more you're doing.

Kinga Hoffman:

The more, the better you are.

Kinga Hoffman:

And it's again, simple as that.

Kinga Hoffman:

I keep explaining this to kids.

Kinga Hoffman:

Look, you need to put their efforts, everything, what you're

Kinga Hoffman:

doing, and what's important to you.

Kinga Hoffman:

That's one thing, second thing is that it takes time and you need

Kinga Hoffman:

to accept that it takes time.

Kinga Hoffman:

You didn't walk when you were a child, you need to, you had to learn how to

Kinga Hoffman:

walk anywhere, landing so many times on your bum, we just don't remember

Kinga Hoffman:

this, because if we would remember that.

Kinga Hoffman:

We wouldn't then make enough effort to kind of start and go

Kinga Hoffman:

back again and go back again.

Kinga Hoffman:

So that's what really fascinated me at this moment as well is because I've got a

Kinga Hoffman:

son who is eight years old and I kind of go through the school system, uh, sorry.

Kinga Hoffman:

There was a phone, unfortunately.

Kinga Hoffman:

Uh, I go through the school system with him as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

And what really fascinates me is the failure problem.

Kinga Hoffman:

Kids are being taught.

Kinga Hoffman:

That failure is something horrible when it's not failure, isn't a natural

Kinga Hoffman:

process of learning and the way, the way that we make mistakes, this is how

Kinga Hoffman:

we learn, basically, simply as that.

Kinga Hoffman:

And, and again, going back to your crochet.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's difficult in the beginning, but I'm sure it's again, as I said, the time and

Kinga Hoffman:

time during this time sometimes again, and I'm sure you are at master level now

Vicki Weinberg:

yeah, I'm your're right.

Vicki Weinberg:

Now that, after I got over that initial hurdle, I definitely got very good.

Vicki Weinberg:

I think, I think you're right.

Vicki Weinberg:

I think as one of the things you talking about life moving fast is

Vicki Weinberg:

that as an adult, it's, it's giving yourself the time to try something

Vicki Weinberg:

new, because you feel like either you should be doing something else or, you

Vicki Weinberg:

know, something more productive in air quotes or something more productive.

Vicki Weinberg:

You could be doing this spending half an hour with some yarn and a needle.

Vicki Weinberg:

You have that thought as well.

Vicki Weinberg:

It's interesting what you said about failure.

Vicki Weinberg:

Cause my son is also 8 and M also can sometimes have this

Vicki Weinberg:

mindset that, oh, if I can't do it immediately, then I can't do it.

Vicki Weinberg:

Then it's not worth doing.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, it's too hard.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, and I think a growth mindset is definitely something that if we can

Vicki Weinberg:

get our kids into that way of thinking.

Vicki Weinberg:

It would definitely help us so much as adults.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, because I think there is that thing as well of like taking time to

Vicki Weinberg:

do something for yourself, you know, if you can't crochet or cross stitch

Vicki Weinberg:

or whatever, then maybe you think, oh, well I just leave it because I don't

Vicki Weinberg:

really have the time to learn that.

Vicki Weinberg:

And well, maybe I'm too old to learn that or whatever the thing is.

Vicki Weinberg:

I think it's so easy to talk yourself out of trying.

Kinga Hoffman:

Again, you actually might a really, um, important point.

Kinga Hoffman:

Uh, the other thing that really stop us in blocks is the belief that because we

Kinga Hoffman:

finished schools and universities, we know everything already, so we should

Kinga Hoffman:

be good immediately at something.

Kinga Hoffman:

Great.

Kinga Hoffman:

You know, like, like cross-stitching, well, this, this, you know, it

Kinga Hoffman:

should be, it should be easy.

Kinga Hoffman:

I'm okay.

Kinga Hoffman:

And as soon as it's not easy, Our brains tells us like, okay, um,

Kinga Hoffman:

do you really want to do this?

Kinga Hoffman:

And it's it's again, I believe it's quite natural, but because we are.

Kinga Hoffman:

Being spoiled, but as I say, Amazon prime, when you press the button and

Kinga Hoffman:

you get them, I think next day morning, or by the, you know, watching all

Kinga Hoffman:

of the things on the social media, one of the things I've speed up and

Kinga Hoffman:

then obviously looks like, you know, something like five minutes, craft.

Kinga Hoffman:

I think it's one thing on Facebook or on, um, Instagram, when the things are

Kinga Hoffman:

happening immediately, like concrete is drying out within the split of the second.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's not happening.

Kinga Hoffman:

I'm really sorry.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's not happening.

Kinga Hoffman:

So, so I think that's what makes the illusion that if it's not happening

Kinga Hoffman:

immediately, it's not worth it or trying, or if it's not happening well

Kinga Hoffman:

immediately then I'm not good at it.

Kinga Hoffman:

And again, that's .That's phrase from, from kids of school, age,

Kinga Hoffman:

breaks my heart, because whenever.

Kinga Hoffman:

Trying to introduce something.

Kinga Hoffman:

I'm trying to say, look, maybe you're going to try this.

Kinga Hoffman:

And there was this phrase I'm not good at it.

Kinga Hoffman:

And I'm like, what does it mean?

Kinga Hoffman:

Have you tried long enough to be a good at it or, you know, have you tried at all?

Kinga Hoffman:

Cause some kids they're not even trying because they not

Kinga Hoffman:

good at it and I'm like, really.

Kinga Hoffman:

Yeah, that's really, it's really sad.

Kinga Hoffman:

Isn't it?

Vicki Weinberg:

So I wanted to have, and to have you on for this episode, because

Vicki Weinberg:

I wanted to talk a bit about creativity and being creative, because I know lots

Vicki Weinberg:

of listeners have creative businesses.

Vicki Weinberg:

And I also think there are those who might like to have a creative business

Vicki Weinberg:

or equally, you know, there'll be lots of people listening who have some sort

Vicki Weinberg:

of hobby that they want to do that never ever will be a business, but.

Vicki Weinberg:

For fun, like with me and my crochet, I'm never ever going to sell any

Vicki Weinberg:

of it, but it's, it's fun to do.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, but I just want to talk to you about creativity because I think

Vicki Weinberg:

for a lot of the reasons you've outlined, it's like really important.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, so can you tell us some of the benefits of taking time to be creative and

Vicki Weinberg:

create things and just, yeah, just play a little bit for want of a better word.

Kinga Hoffman:

I mean, I, uh, I think that the benefits are well known.

Kinga Hoffman:

But we tend to forget about it first, first, you know, as again, as you

Kinga Hoffman:

said with, uh, w what we experienced with lockdown is that we had suddenly

Kinga Hoffman:

had so much time on our hands.

Kinga Hoffman:

Yeah.

Kinga Hoffman:

Some people that they were on furlough scheme, they didn't have to work, or they

Kinga Hoffman:

were, you know, they were sitting at home.

Kinga Hoffman:

We all been sitting at home and, and we had so much time.

Kinga Hoffman:

And so, uh, saying simply creativity, um, first of all.

Kinga Hoffman:

Allows you to make the space.

Kinga Hoffman:

You make the space for yourself, obviously that connects to the wellbeing as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

You allow yourself to have a space, to have a thought about something, to

Kinga Hoffman:

start doing something, um, which is, uh, an amazing process for our brain.

Kinga Hoffman:

Because as soon as you become creative, our brain starts

Kinga Hoffman:

functioning slightly different.

Kinga Hoffman:

That has a connection with this magical flow.

Kinga Hoffman:

So basically when you're, uh, being creative, when you, when something

Kinga Hoffman:

really pulls you out and you become in the zone, when you nothing really

Kinga Hoffman:

matters, you know, I mean the zone is, it doesn't matter if it's coloring.

Kinga Hoffman:

If it's writing, if it's painting, if it's drawing, if it's cross-stitching, if it's.

Kinga Hoffman:

And it aspect of creativity, your brain starts functioning,

Kinga Hoffman:

functioning, slightly different.

Kinga Hoffman:

So it kind of allows you to, to be in that flow moment and your prefrontal cortex,

Kinga Hoffman:

um, gives you a space, basically calms down a little bit and it's better as

Kinga Hoffman:

well to, um, to come up with the really important thoughts in your brain because

Kinga Hoffman:

everything else is kind of quiet down.

Kinga Hoffman:

Your thoughts, your original thoughts.

Kinga Hoffman:

More prone to be built up.

Kinga Hoffman:

Does it make sense a little bit?

Vicki Weinberg:

That does make sense because I find that doing something well,

Vicki Weinberg:

for me, if I'm doing something creative, Because you have to concentrate on your

Vicki Weinberg:

stitches or your colors or whatever it is.

Vicki Weinberg:

Some of those other, thoughts those nagging thoughts just disappear,

Vicki Weinberg:

it's recede a bit because you don't have the space to think about

Vicki Weinberg:

your worries or whatever else.

Kinga Hoffman:

And, and what really connects to this one is that when you see

Kinga Hoffman:

the effect of the, of the, your creative time, there's this huge release of the,

Kinga Hoffman:

of the neuron neuro hormones coming up.

Kinga Hoffman:

So all the.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, magic words like serotonin dopamine, endorphins that you you're getting a huge,

Kinga Hoffman:

really huge boost out of the creativity.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, there is, you know, as I said before, uh, benefits of being creative, the,

Kinga Hoffman:

the, you know, you can, you can keep telling the stories about them because

Kinga Hoffman:

they, you know, there was so many of them like you, um, improve your social

Kinga Hoffman:

skills and social life, because if you creative with the others, obviously

Kinga Hoffman:

that's kind of, you know, Self-explanatory you, you, you making a connections.

Kinga Hoffman:

If you showing off your creativity again, you making a connection.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, if you, uh, if, uh, if you creative that improves your mind, um, uh,

Kinga Hoffman:

improves your brain functioning, uh, alleviates the stress and anxiety.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, you know, it's, it's, it's so many of those that even some questions,

Kinga Hoffman:

some, uh, some, some research and.

Kinga Hoffman:

that creativity boosts immune system.

Kinga Hoffman:

I don't know how they, I didn't find the proper, the right research, but I've seen

Kinga Hoffman:

in a few, um, articles about creativity that actually the more creative you are,

Kinga Hoffman:

somehow it has an impact on your immune system, which is like crazy how you know,

Kinga Hoffman:

but it is, I presume it might be down to the brain functioning and kind of.

Kinga Hoffman:

calm calm down moment and, and, and stress relief basically.

Kinga Hoffman:

Cause if we know that if you are very stressed, it's really

Kinga Hoffman:

easy to get sick and ill.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, so yeah, so it's, it's really beneficial for our lives

Kinga Hoffman:

basically to be creative and.

Kinga Hoffman:

There is a big myth about creativity as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

I mean, like, I believe that every one of us is creative.

Kinga Hoffman:

I mean, if someone says I'm not creative at all, as I mentioned that

Kinga Hoffman:

before, it's simply, he's not aware of his potentials and skills, because

Kinga Hoffman:

even if you have to make a meal for your kids after school, you need

Kinga Hoffman:

to think, oh, what I need to cook?

Kinga Hoffman:

That's creative.

Kinga Hoffman:

Oh, you're looking into your, into your fridge and you've got some produce in

Kinga Hoffman:

your fridge and you're coming up with some dish that's creativity in a, in a, in a,

Kinga Hoffman:

in a very basic way, but it's creativity.

Kinga Hoffman:

If you're coming to the problem, solving the problem again, creativity in the,

Kinga Hoffman:

in the, in the, in the simplest form.

Kinga Hoffman:

So it's, um, it, you know, it's, the creativity is everywhere and,

Kinga Hoffman:

uh, every one of us is creative.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's a really good point actually that I have

Vicki Weinberg:

had people say that before.

Vicki Weinberg:

Oh, I'm not very creative.

Vicki Weinberg:

Do you have any, um, I dunno, any tips for how people can, perhaps I

Vicki Weinberg:

don't want to say become more creative because like you say, I believe I also

Vicki Weinberg:

believe that everyone's got it inside them, but I don't know any advice for

Vicki Weinberg:

people who think they're not creative, but quite likely the idea of, of.

Vicki Weinberg:

Do it you're being creative.

Vicki Weinberg:

I'm trying to think how to word it.

Vicki Weinberg:

Like idea of being creative, perhaps don't consider themselves creative.

Vicki Weinberg:

Now do you have any things people could try.

Kinga Hoffman:

I mean, um, first of all, I'm not the best person to give

Kinga Hoffman:

advice as I don't like giving advice because I don't like, well, it's, it's,

Kinga Hoffman:

you know, difficult to give advisors, but as I said, everyone is creative

Kinga Hoffman:

and I think, um, the, the, the best tips, how to kind of rediscover the

Kinga Hoffman:

creativity is to do the small steps.

Kinga Hoffman:

So, uh, finding your time, basically, if you, if you are a busy mom or busy,

Kinga Hoffman:

that kind of a busy either person, um, find yourself a time, 15 minutes

Kinga Hoffman:

per day, where you can do some stuff.

Kinga Hoffman:

Yeah.

Kinga Hoffman:

You can, you can try as many things as possible.

Kinga Hoffman:

I mean, like nobody, there was no limit basically, and nobody

Kinga Hoffman:

has a right to judge you as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

So yeah.

Kinga Hoffman:

You can try this at home.

Kinga Hoffman:

You can try to write, you can try to draw scribbles, um, crochet

Kinga Hoffman:

thing, or you can go and join.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, there is so many activities out there, you know, you can do

Kinga Hoffman:

the pottery, you can do, um, drama.

Kinga Hoffman:

You can do, you know, there is a creative writing sessions that

Kinga Hoffman:

drawing sessions does like X amount of activities that you could go and try.

Kinga Hoffman:

Don't take yourself too seriously as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

I think I would say because, um, you need to be open-minded you need to be

Kinga Hoffman:

ready to play a little bit, to have fun.

Kinga Hoffman:

So, uh, you know, kind of maybe change a little bit of attitude if,

Kinga Hoffman:

if you're really a serious person.

Kinga Hoffman:

I mean, it's nothing wrong to be serious, of course, but trying to kind

Kinga Hoffman:

of open minds a little bit more, and I think that, uh, Being curious as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's a good, good thing because we do forget how, how it is to be a curious,

Kinga Hoffman:

and I think it's a really important thing to keep asking the question.

Kinga Hoffman:

Why, why, where, how, uh, because all of those questions directly

Kinga Hoffman:

ran to the answers or not, but they kind of allow you to search for it.

Kinga Hoffman:

And then it's another creative process.

Kinga Hoffman:

So keep asking the questions.

Kinga Hoffman:

We never too old to learn.

Kinga Hoffman:

We supposed to learn all our life because if the moment when we stop

Kinga Hoffman:

learning, the brain starts dying slowly, but they do, um, yeah.

Kinga Hoffman:

Keep, you know, keep showing your work again.

Kinga Hoffman:

It doesn't matter if it's good, if it's bad, or if someone says

Kinga Hoffman:

it's bad, it doesn't matter.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's yours.

Kinga Hoffman:

It makes you happy.

Kinga Hoffman:

Nobody has a right to tell you.

Kinga Hoffman:

What's good.

Kinga Hoffman:

What's not.

Kinga Hoffman:

Yeah.

Kinga Hoffman:

So, so keep, you know, keep showing this, I know journal journaling

Kinga Hoffman:

is really good way as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

Again, it doesn't need to be shown as, as you said, it doesn't need to

Kinga Hoffman:

be a business plan, but if something makes you happy, keep doing it.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you.

Vicki Weinberg:

I know you said you don't like to give advice, which I completely

Vicki Weinberg:

get, but I think we could take these all as suggestions.

Vicki Weinberg:

Cause another thing that I was just thinking, as you were talking is

Vicki Weinberg:

this suggestion that I have is for those of you listening with children

Vicki Weinberg:

is to kind of maybe joining some of your children's activities.

Vicki Weinberg:

So for example, since having children.

Vicki Weinberg:

I've discovered that I quite like coloring cause they like colouring.

Vicki Weinberg:

I've discovered I quite like building things with Lego.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, and these were things that I would have done as a kid, but I think if I

Vicki Weinberg:

hadn't had my own children and hadn't sat down at the table and joined in with

Vicki Weinberg:

their activities, I probably wouldn't have realized I enjoyed as an adult.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, and don't get me wrong.

Vicki Weinberg:

I don't enjoy all of the things that they want to do, but it's quite nice when

Vicki Weinberg:

they get a craft set or something to sit down and go, okay, so what's this about?

Vicki Weinberg:

And let's join in.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, and I think that's quite a nice way of finding things that

Vicki Weinberg:

you enjoy is just to, yeah.

Vicki Weinberg:

Think a bit like a child's a little bit, and don't worry if

Vicki Weinberg:

you get it wrong or it looks

Kinga Hoffman:

exactly like don't be so serious.

Kinga Hoffman:

Just be, be yourself and find what makes you happy.

Kinga Hoffman:

I mean, like if you don't have any other.

Kinga Hoffman:

You know, the sky's the limit, basically, you know, you can be

Kinga Hoffman:

creative in so many ways go and do it.

Kinga Hoffman:

I know it's not easy sometimes, but, uh, always ways and, um, and even small

Kinga Hoffman:

things, uh, I important and it has a huge impact on our mental health.

Kinga Hoffman:

And that's another thing which is really important at this moment.

Kinga Hoffman:

Cause we, we coming out of the pandemic moment, we don't

Kinga Hoffman:

know what's going to happen.

Kinga Hoffman:

So.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, especially doing it, you know, our kids and in our lives, grownups doesn't

Kinga Hoffman:

matter if you're a child and not mental health has been impacted by the, by

Kinga Hoffman:

the lockdown lock downs and by Corona.

Kinga Hoffman:

So it's really important to find something that makes you

Kinga Hoffman:

simply happy if it's baking.

Kinga Hoffman:

If it's, I don't know, um, gardening, that's like, you know,

Kinga Hoffman:

so many ways you can be creative.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah.

Vicki Weinberg:

I mean, did you want to talk at all about the link between, um,

Vicki Weinberg:

creativity and wellbeing I've heard?

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, obviously I've, I've heard that it is good to do creative things

Vicki Weinberg:

I've heard it, it can improve your mood and your wellbeing.

Vicki Weinberg:

Is there anything else you wanted to add to that?

Kinga Hoffman:

W nothing more.

Kinga Hoffman:

I presumably I will repeat myself, but, uh, as I said, I, I found that

Kinga Hoffman:

really fascinating that actually, when we are creative in any way that our

Kinga Hoffman:

brain changes and, and kind of, you know, it's, it's, it's been researched,

Kinga Hoffman:

it's been proved that basically the brainwaves going slow and, and, and,

Kinga Hoffman:

you know, it's, it's a different state.

Kinga Hoffman:

We, we go in, we can actually.

Kinga Hoffman:

Aloud.

Kinga Hoffman:

I'm a brain to calm down a little bit.

Kinga Hoffman:

And again, as I said, we live in really fast times.

Kinga Hoffman:

I think the, the moment for our own, for our brains to slow down

Kinga Hoffman:

and it's extremely important.

Kinga Hoffman:

And, uh, you know, that's, that's the biggest wellbeing.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, the link of the, you know, out of creativity, I think, I think it's

Kinga Hoffman:

important to give yourself time.

Kinga Hoffman:

We know how, uh, we all busy.

Kinga Hoffman:

And, uh, and it's extremely important to allow ourselves

Kinga Hoffman:

a bit of time for ourselves.

Kinga Hoffman:

I'm really sorry.

Kinga Hoffman:

Sometimes English language.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's a, um, it's a, it's a difficult language for me.

Vicki Weinberg:

Oh, don't worry at all you have nothing to apologize for.

Vicki Weinberg:

I promise.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, just a few final questions before we finish up first, I cannot resist

Vicki Weinberg:

asking you this Kinga what creative activities do you do personally.

Vicki Weinberg:

I'm just interested

Kinga Hoffman:

that it's a lot.

Kinga Hoffman:

I mean, um, I'm trying to.

Kinga Hoffman:

Well, because I work as a, in my dream work and that place, um, I'm

Kinga Hoffman:

basically allowed to be creative every time of every moment that's work.

Kinga Hoffman:

So we do a lot of, um, art stuff.

Kinga Hoffman:

I think the most favorite moment.

Kinga Hoffman:

My favorite thing at this moment is to checking out all

Kinga Hoffman:

of those crepes from Danes.

Kinga Hoffman:

And that's the, so basically I, I do spend a lot of time on, on the internet.

Kinga Hoffman:

So I do, um, research stuff like, oh, New masks or different ones.

Kinga Hoffman:

And then I kind of bring this back to my kids and we try them together and see

Kinga Hoffman:

how easy it is to do how, you know, what else we can do out of it if it's working.

Kinga Hoffman:

So all the new stuff all the new techniques, like, you know, big, um, big

Kinga Hoffman:

thing for me was discovering the marbling.

Kinga Hoffman:

Cause marbling is absolutely relaxing and it's, and it gives you so much of a.

Kinga Hoffman:

Pleasure and so much have a great effect as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

Uh, and I found that on the internet.

Kinga Hoffman:

So kind of checking out the stuff that you can see on the internet.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's a, it's a kind of like my creative wild moments and, and,

Kinga Hoffman:

and showing this to the kids.

Kinga Hoffman:

It's, it's brilliant.

Kinga Hoffman:

I do a little bit of crochet.

Kinga Hoffman:

I, um, did we, did we created our garden and when, when I was in lockdown

Kinga Hoffman:

out of nothing, basically, because we've got to kind of like a concrete

Kinga Hoffman:

yard on the back of the building where I live, um, What else I do.

Kinga Hoffman:

I'm not a really huge fan of baking.

Kinga Hoffman:

I would love to know how to bake, but, uh, maybe one day I will learn more baking.

Kinga Hoffman:

Um, yeah, that's pretty at this moment.

Kinga Hoffman:

Somehow feels like it's a lot because, uh, the place where I work.

Kinga Hoffman:

So, you know, it's, it's, I mean, like I do birthday party and I've got a one

Kinga Hoffman:

birthday party planned on Thursday and the theme of the birthday party it's dinosaur.

Kinga Hoffman:

So at this moment, my head is literally filled out with the ideas of dinosaurs,

Kinga Hoffman:

what we can do, how, how much time we're going to spend on it so.

Kinga Hoffman:

Even if you have party planner, you are creative.

Kinga Hoffman:

Yeah, of course.

Kinga Hoffman:

Even if you are doctor, so you are creative, I'm just trying to show even

Kinga Hoffman:

if you are, you know, uh, I don't know, person who, uh, works in a funeral

Kinga Hoffman:

company, you can be creative to make, you know, a memorable last memories.

Kinga Hoffman:

Yeah.

Kinga Hoffman:

So it's, it's all this.

Kinga Hoffman:

Areas of our life.

Kinga Hoffman:

You can, and you are creative in it.

Kinga Hoffman:

So, so I think the, the impact on creativity is enormous and

Kinga Hoffman:

we need to keep being creative.

Kinga Hoffman:

We need to kind of.

Kinga Hoffman:

Uh, take care about it and enjoy it

Vicki Weinberg:

yeah.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you.

Vicki Weinberg:

I think enjoying it.

Vicki Weinberg:

It's definitely one of the key things I want to take away from this.

Vicki Weinberg:

And thank you so much for everything you've shared.

Vicki Weinberg:

I really hope that this is going to inspire people to try something

Vicki Weinberg:

creative, whether it's something new or something they enjoyed as a

Vicki Weinberg:

child or, yeah, just something they think, oh, that looks like fun.

Vicki Weinberg:

And just to do it for fun.

Vicki Weinberg:

And like I said earlier, whether it becomes anything or whatever, it's

Vicki Weinberg:

just, you know, like something you do to relax and have some time to yourself.

Vicki Weinberg:

I think there's definitely lots of benefits.

Vicki Weinberg:

So thank you for coming on and talking about this because I think

Vicki Weinberg:

it is a really interesting subject.

Vicki Weinberg:

And while I've spoken to lots of creative business owners, we haven't actually

Vicki Weinberg:

talked that much about creativity and that is something that I'm fascinated by.

Vicki Weinberg:

So thank you for coming and spending the time.

Kinga Hoffman:

Thank you very much for having me.

Kinga Hoffman:

And, and, and if anyone wants to join me at House of Culture, we've got

Kinga Hoffman:

some art sessions for adults as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

So I'm sure you're going to have links to our Facebook and Instagram and

Kinga Hoffman:

all the information can be found at

Vicki Weinberg:

I definitely am.

Vicki Weinberg:

And I'm really excited to you've got sessions for adults.

Vicki Weinberg:

Cause I, that was another, I was going to be my final question

Vicki Weinberg:

because I could see you have lots of children, so that's great.

Vicki Weinberg:

If and when I can ever make it down to Brighton and I would

Vicki Weinberg:

love to come to a session,

Kinga Hoffman:

please do it's on Mondays and Wednesdays seven till 9:00 PM.

Kinga Hoffman:

Of course.

Kinga Hoffman:

And you are allowed to bring your own beverages.

Kinga Hoffman:

So if someone likes to create with a glass of wine, Bring it on I'm more than happy

Kinga Hoffman:

and that all materials, um, down there.

Kinga Hoffman:

So you don't need to bring anything, just need to bring yourself and try or

Kinga Hoffman:

creates your favourite techniques or create, you know, favourite material.

Kinga Hoffman:

So it's a, it's a brilliant, um, opportunity to talk to the others as well.

Kinga Hoffman:

So it's, I think it's a kind of like a nice social.

Kinga Hoffman:

Uh, place as well to be, and you can even swing on the swings if you want,

Kinga Hoffman:

because they are for kids and for others.

Kinga Hoffman:

So if someone likes to go back to the memories from childhood,

Kinga Hoffman:

you are more than welcome.

Vicki Weinberg:

Oh, it sounds brilliant.

Vicki Weinberg:

And I would definitely come visit.

Vicki Weinberg:

It sounds amazing.

Vicki Weinberg:

So thank you so much.

Vicki Weinberg:

And yes, I will link to your website, your social media and

Vicki Weinberg:

everything else in the show notes.

Vicki Weinberg:

So people can come and take a look and thank you so much

Vicki Weinberg:

again for your time today.

Kinga Hoffman:

Thank you very much.

Kinga Hoffman:

Thank you very much for having me.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you so much for listening all the way

Vicki Weinberg:

to the end of this episode.

Vicki Weinberg:

If you enjoyed it, please do leave me a review that really helps

Vicki Weinberg:

other people to find this podcast.

Vicki Weinberg:

Make sure you subscribe so you don't miss any future episodes and

Vicki Weinberg:

do tell your friends about it too.

Vicki Weinberg:

If you think that they also might enjoy it, can find me at www.Vickiweinberg.com.

Vicki Weinberg:

There you'll find links to all of my social channels.

Vicki Weinberg:

You'll find lots of more information.

Vicki Weinberg:

All of the past podcast episodes and lots of free resources too.

Vicki Weinberg:

So again, that's www.vickiweinberg.com.

Vicki Weinberg:

Take care, have a good week and see you next time.