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Amy is a social media and digital marketing coach specialising in working with small to medium sized service based businesses. Amy reached a full client roster and six figures in her business all in a year after coming back from maternity leave, working four days a week. It’s Amy’s mission to help clients see growth in client sales, prospects, reach, and warm leads and engagement through sharing her knowledge and expertise. 

While Amy mainly works with service based businesses, today I’ve invited her on to share advice about social media planning and content strategy for product businesses in 2024. 

Amy offered really valuable insights into mapping out social media over the next year – from identifying relevant channels and navigating trends to determining the types of content and campaigns to prioritise each month. Whether you meticulously plan out every social media post or take a more spontaneous approach, there is lots here to take away and use in 2024.

  • An introduction to herself and her business (02:07)
  • Why you should start thinking about your 2024 social media now (02:43)
  • Working out your key dates for the year ahead (04:09)
  • What to do if you have a month where it looks like you won’t have something to talk about (08:54)
  • The power of relaunching products and services (10:54)
  • How often you should be posting about your products, and the mix of posts you should be sharing (12:26)
  • The importance of using Instagram stories (13:51)
  • Deciding which channels to focus on (18:18)
  • Using Google Analytics to make strategic choices about which social media channels are working for you (22:39)
  • Navigating social media trends like Threads (26:52)
  • Using micro influencers (38:49)
  • Her number one piece of social media advice for product creators (39:36)

The Bring Your Product Idea to Life Podcast  – Best Business Podcast Award, Independent Podcast Awards 2023

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Transcript
Vicki Weinberg:

Welcome to the Bring Your Product Idea to Life podcast. This is the podcast for you if you're getting started selling products, or if you'd like to create your own product to sell. I'm Vicki Weinberg, a product creation coach and Amazon expert. Every week I share friendly, practical advice, as well as inspirational stories from small businesses. Let's get started. Hello, I am so excited today to have Amy Atkinson join me on the podcast. Amy is a social media and digital marketing coach specializing in working with small to museum sized service based businesses. Amy reached a full client roster and six figures in her business all in a year after coming back from maternity leave, working four days a week. It's Amy's mission to help clients see growth in client sales, prospects, reach, and warm leads and engagement through sharing her knowledge and expertise. So while Amy mainly works with service based businesses, today I've invited her on to speak about product businesses and specifically about social media and the kind of things we need to be thinking about when planning social media for 2024. Which, as you know, isn't far away now, is it? Even at the time of recording this, not very far away. So Amy had some really great advice about how to plan out your social media for next year, the kind of content to consider. We spoke about channels. Um, we spoke about trends, if there's anything particular people should be trying or maybe not trying next year. All in all, I think this was such a useful episode. And even if you haven't, you know, even if you're a sort of person who doesn't really plan your social media. I think Amy's approach of just taking the year month by month and thinking what's coming up and what could you speak about will help you massively. So I do encourage you not only to listen to the episode, but also to take even half an hour and just think about next year. And I really think this will help you in the long run. And, um, I would love now to introduce you to Amy. Hi, Amy. Thank you so much for being here

Amy Atkinson:

Thank you for having me.

Vicki Weinberg:

Oh, you're so welcome. Can we start with you? Please give an introduction to you, your business and what you do.

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah, of course. So hi everybody. My name is Amy Atkinson and I am the owner and founder of the Femtrepreneur. Marketing training agency and consultancy. And I basically, or me and my team work with small to medium sized businesses, whether that's through done for you services or teaching and training them to really grow their business through social media.

Vicki Weinberg:

Brilliant. Thank you so much. So I've invited you on to talk about social media specifically for 2024 because we're recording this towards the end of the year. But why do we need to be thinking about our 2024 social media now? So for example December 2024 seems a really long way. Do we really need to be thinking that far in advance at the end of 2023?

Amy Atkinson:

This is so funny and I get asked this question a lot, but actually the reason I highly recommend it is because you can get yourself prepared. It means when it comes to social media, you're going to feel less overwhelmed when you actually get there. And what I would say is when you're thinking about your social media for 2024, don't necessarily, and you don't need to think about, right, on the 24th of December, I'm going to post XYZ. That's absolutely not necessary because you don't know what's going to happen in the world between now and then. But what I would really recommend people do is to have a think about roughly what you're going to do when. So when are you launching any new products? What is your customer feeling at any one particular time? Because then, when you start to fully understand that, it means you can build your social media calendar around it. So, as much as you're not necessarily understanding the exact posts, you are starting to plot out what your 2024 looks like.

Vicki Weinberg:

That makes total sense. Thank you. And I guess it also means that you can kind of plan ahead for key dates that are specific to your business. So for example, Valentine's Day, Mother's Day, Father's Day, school holidays, all those things. I guess anything that's relevant and you know is happening, you know, regardless, it does make sense to planning now, because I do know lots of businesses get to begin in February and say, oh, we should do something for Valentine's day, for example. And I'm guilty myself of always leaving things way too late, even though I know they're happening because they happen every year. So I think having a plan, I guess will save you time in the longterm because you'll already have sort of have a rough idea for what you're going to do before you hit those dates.

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah, exactly. And even if you have a think about, so say you know that your business is perfect to be selling more around Valentine's Day, even if you have in your mind that you're going to think about the exact thing for it in the middle of January, for example, you're just going to feel so much happier, more prepared, less overwhelmed when it comes to actually promoting things for Valentine's Day. Um, but equally if you're, I'm laughing because this is a very sweeping statement from me. But most men don't think about it to usually the week of or the day before. So if your product is for a woman that a man is buying, then obviously you don't really need to think about it in the middle of January. But what you might want to do is start planting the seeds for those women to then think, oh, I'm going to send this link, or I'm going to send this information to my other half in mid January, because us women, again, this is very sweeping statement, so I do apologize, but some women might have thought ahead about it, about what they want or would quite like for Valentine's day.

Vicki Weinberg:

That makes sense. Thank you. And so other than these key dates, what, and you've mentioned some, some other things that you mentioned product launches, for example, are there any other things we should be thinking about when we're planning out the year overall?

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah, so, um, on top of launching or relaunching your products, um, what I would really, really, really, really think about is where is your customer as it, and when I say this, where is their head at? What are they thinking at each time of the year? So I've kind of alluded to it already. With Valentine's day. Um, but say for example, your product is geared towards children, or perhaps it's geared towards a mum. She is potentially going to be way too busy in the summertime to think about buying anything for herself. She might think about buying something for her children. So how, when you know that, how, what you can then think about is, how am I making it easier for her to buy during the summertime? Or am I going to start launching my product much before summer? So perhaps a month before the summer period, perhaps May, June, beginning of June time, so that it gives them the opportunity to not feel overwhelmed because being a mum ourselves, we know what it's like during those summer period, the summer months and well, you're just so in the nitty gritty of perhaps trying to keep your business going full stop, but also looking after your children and doing the juggle of the both of them, that when it comes to buying something, you're not thinking about it. So what I really, really recommend you do is really understand your customer, really understand what they're thinking at any one time of the month so that you can then start to plan your calendar around that. Because ultimately and the reason I get people to think about this year on year is that really that's not going to change. Things might happen in the world. We know what things have happened recently, but ultimately the way your customer is going to feel is pretty much going to stay the same. So you can plan around that.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really helpful. Thank you, Amy. And so to make it really, really simple, I guess we're just thinking about for now, thinking about the year and trying to think about, okay, what might be happening in January? What might I be talking about February, March, et cetera. So at the moment, we're just talking about having things mapped out that really high level.

Amy Atkinson:

Exactly. So it means that when you get to January, when you get to March, you know, roughly what you're going to talk about. And it just means that when it comes to your social media, it's going to be so much easier for you to come up with ideas.

Vicki Weinberg:

And what do we do if we're, so we start this process and then we go, oh my gosh, I can't think of a single thing happening in April. I'm just picking a random month. I can't think of thinking of something in the world. I can't think of anything happening in my business. What do we do?

Amy Atkinson:

Exactly. What do you do? Um, so what are you talking about now when you're thinking about it now?

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah. Yeah. When you're thinking about it now, do we need to panic if there's some months where we're like, I don't know what's happening? Is that a big concern or, or not yet?

Amy Atkinson:

I don't think so. Um. If I'm completely honest, there probably will be always something happening in any particular month, whether that is a key date that you can Google or whether it's, um, dates to do that are relevant to your target market. There's almost always something happening, or there's almost always something they're thinking or feeling. And so, for example, a lot of people might think, oh, January is usually really quiet. Um people don't necessarily want to buy any products or anything like that in January because they perhaps spent everything they possibly could do in the lead up to Christmas. But what you could do is come up with ideas and thoughts around how that person's feeling. So perhaps they are feeling a bit January blue, like, as in they've gone back to work. There's no bank holidays now for a few months. What can you do to help them get through that January month that's relevant to the products? And it's all about thinking outside of the box. So, um, if you can really, again, understand your ideal customer, think about how they're thinking, whether that's relevant to your products or not. How can you sideline or think laterally about what you could do to help them during that time.

Vicki Weinberg:

That makes sense. Thank you. And you mentioned earlier, Amy, you're talking about launching and relaunching products. When you talk about relaunching products, do you mean like maybe talking more about a product you haven't, you know, you haven't been speaking about for a while? Is that what you meant by that?

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah. So what I find when it comes to this could be relevant for services, but also products themselves, is that you might have brought out a brand new product two years ago, and you've since launched lots of new things, but ultimately your first product that you brought out was the reason you started your business. Perhaps it was something that you recognized that people really needed. There's absolutely no harm and even if it's not changed at all, there's no harm in you saying, oh, this is the first ever product we made. We absolutely loved it. It flew off the shelves and you're almost putting it back in the spotlight again. So that's what I mean about relaunching products, even if they haven't necessarily changed, you're just giving it its time again on social media.

Vicki Weinberg:

Perfect. That's what I thought. And that's also might be really good for those months where you're not really sure what you could be focused about. Like if we're talking about having a theme some months, for example, maybe it is that there's one month where you think, okay, there's not much going on in the world for my customers. What I'm actually going to do is talk about this particular product that I've been quiet about for the last, however long.

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah, for sure. Definitely.

Vicki Weinberg:

And when we are talking specifically about our products, how often is too often? Do you see what I mean? Because I know we need to have a mix of, so when we're talking about social media, we need to have a mix of different posts and they can't all be about, I've got this by this, I've got this by this. What's kind of the, I don't know if there's a ratio or, or how often can we actually be telling people what we sell? Because I guess as a product business, that's ultimately our goal is to sell a product, hopefully a brilliant product that's going to help people enhance their lives. Um, but how do we do that? Because I know that lots of my audience struggle with being too salesy, you know, feeling like they don't want to just keep pushing their products at people.

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah. And I think that, that is something that a lot of people struggle with. And what I would say is that as a product based business, your, so let's talk about Instagram, for example, your grid should clearly showcase what your products are and therefore you don't necessarily have to be posting something, a product every single day. Let me explain that in a bit more detail. So that's specifically to your grid. You could potentially post a different product image or a testimonial or somebody using it, showing how it works, um, every other day, perhaps three times a week on your actual grid. When it comes to stories and stories are relevant on Facebook and they're relevant on Instagram. This is where you can show up every single day and sell. And what I would say with this is that people really like to buy, but they don't like to be told what to buy. So this is where your message is so important. And what I would really recommend you do is, again, when you're understanding your customers, they're buying from you because they've built up trust in you. They believe your product's going to work. They've seen other people use it. They've seen other people like it. So what you might want to do is have a look at creating content that is based solely around people trying, touching, feeling your, your products. Because naturally that is going to help you sell that. You're also including on the stories, you're also including a link for somebody to then go and easily buy it, but you're not going and saying here is a product image on a white background or perhaps someone holding it, go and buy it. You're literally showing somebody how good it is. There's a difference between them.

Vicki Weinberg:

That makes real sense. And I'll be honest when I think to the things that I've brought specifically, because I've sort of seen them on mainly Instagram, because that's the one that I like the most, 9 times out of 10. And that's probably a hundred percent of the time. Actually, if I think about it, things I've brought based on seeing them on Instagram is because either I've seen an influencer talking about them, I say influence, it might be somebody I've never heard of, but it's a real life person is using this product or you know, you've seen the testimonials or whatever it is, you're right. I don't think I've ever bought anything because I thought that's a nice picture. It's always been, you see people using it or wearing it or whatever the thing is, and you can sort of put yourself in their shoes and think, oh yeah, I could use that or whatever it is. I think you're right. And so I guess that's thinking about, yeah, how to, yeah, I guess think of what, of different ways to position your product so that aren't just saying we have this product.

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah, exactly. It's just, it's a slight tweak in your messaging and what you're saying. And an example that I see a lot on Instagram at the moment, and that is just because it's something that I know is affecting me personally at the moment, is having had a baby, I've got saggy skin on my belly, so I keep getting a product from Maely's, which is all about fixing that. I have not bought the product because I don't believe it will work. And the reason I don't believe it will work is because the models that they're using are young, they're young people in their twenties who likely haven't got an issue in the first place. Um, so therefore I'm like, okay, well, of course, of course, they've got toned stomachs. So I hope that helps give somebody a tangible understanding of what it really means for somebody to build up trust in order to buy from them, but that I'm being bombarded by their ads all the time. And yet, they're not using mums, they're not using people like me, and therefore they're targeting mums probably, but they're not their models and the people that are in their imagery are young people in their 20s who have got a perfect tummy already.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah. And I know, I know exactly what you mean about that because I feel the same about skincare as well. When I look at skincare products, if the person is significantly younger or even significantly older than me, because I'm aware of our skin changes as we age, you want to see someone who represents you, don't you? Otherwise it just, I think it's much harder to relate to an image or whatever it is. If you, if you feel like that's not aimed at me. And I. Yeah, that makes real sense. And it's funny, isn't it? You, yeah, we all sort of look for validation and yeah, I think, so knowing it makes good sense, knowing who your customer is and making sure they are actually represented makes a lot of sense.

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah, definitely, definitely.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you so much, Amy. So we've been talking a little bit about content. If it's okay with you, I'd like to talk a little bit about channels and sort of the social media channels we're using. Um, I guess it'd be useful to know how much of a plan we need to have for that. Do we need to stick with the same channels we've been using up until now, or is a new year a good time to try something new? So I know that is a big question. So maybe let's start with the first part, which is, do we need to be, how much planning do we need to do at a channel level?

Amy Atkinson:

I think, um, at this stage, um, okay, so we're, we're in October at the moment at this stage, you probably don't need to think about anything further than the first quarter in terms of channel level. You're, when it comes to planning annually, you want to think about where you're going to focus at any one time. And in order to do that, it's to understand your customer. Um, so you might want to think, okay, well, I know my customer is spending time on Instagram. So therefore that's what I'm going to do. And that's where I'm going to focus. Um, one of your questions, I suppose I could answer now is that whether you should answer some, whether you should answer something new, whether you should try something new. And I, I am a big believer in that as small business owners we've simply do not have the time to do everything all the time. And I really want people to understand their customer, know where their customer is spending time. So therefore, if the Threads as a month ago, launch a few months ago, launched, if your customer has moved onto Threads, absolutely try Threads. If your customer is using Tik Tok, absolutely use Tik Tok. What I don't think is really helpful for anybody is to get caught up with new and shiny objects if your customer isn't spending time there because it means that you're basically spending time creating content for that channel, but no one's necessarily going to buy from it. Does that help?

Vicki Weinberg:

That really helps. Thank you. I'll be really honest with you, Amy. I asked that question for a really specific reason, which is something that my audience asked me quite a lot, is should I be on TikTok? Because as you probably know, TikTok shop has got really big and, um, I think sometimes businesses can fall into the trap of thinking I have to be there. All my competitors are there. I have to be there too. And I'm sure you're going to say that's not, um, it doesn't matter whether your competitors are there. It's whether your customers are there that's important.

Amy Atkinson:

Exactly. Um, and I think what I would say about TikTok is that if you know your customers are there, um, then it would be worthwhile for you and probably would be more worthwhile for you compared to Instagram. And that is because TikTok in comparison to Instagram is quite small. So it means you are more likely to have standout. But the first thing that you really must understand is, is my customer there? And if they're not spending time there, then the chances are you probably don't need to be there either.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really good advice. Thank you. So I guess what could be really useful now is for people to just have a quick review about, you know, the cut, the channels they have currently and are their customers still there. So I, for example, um, it wasn't when it was, but at some point I stopped using Facebook for business. Um, I do one podcast post a week and that's it because I realized that nobody was engaging with my posts on Facebook, I could put on pretty much identical content on LinkedIn or Instagram and we'll get so much more engagement. So that kind of told me that okay, you know, it's just, it's either something to do with the algorithm, which I don't understand or it's that people aren't there, but either way, I was like, I don't know why I'm spending time on this because clearly I'm getting nothing back. It just, it's just one of those fruitless tasks that you end up doing because you've always done it.

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah. The other, the other tip that I would give, um, when it comes to social media content, definitely have a look at what engagement is going on, i. e. whether people are liking, commenting, sharing your posts. But if you have got Google Analytics built into your website, if you go there and have a look at, probably, so you need to change the date range, but go and have a look at whether your customer over the last 90 days, where they've come from, which social media channel they've come from, because I have exactly this with one of my clients that I, um, do a whole load of data analysts for them, analytics for them, and they get terrible engagement on Facebook compared to LinkedIn, much like you've just said, they don't, they're not on Instagram. Um, but they get more traffic from Facebook than they do from LinkedIn to their website.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's so interesting.

Amy Atkinson:

So even though people aren't liking the post, they're the people that are even more warm, if you like, they're a warmer lead because they're actually bothering to go to your website.

Vicki Weinberg:

That is such a great tip, Amy, thank you. As soon as we were done on this call, you know, I'm going straight to Google Analytics to find out where people are coming from. That's brilliant. Thank you. That's a really good tip. And I think maybe that's something worth everyone looking at when thinking about next year to make it like, like you say, a really informed decision about, especially if you're, you know, you're. Because I think some of us can fall into the trap. I certainly did this, thinking I needed to be on all the channels and then just found it was too much. And then gradually I've sort of cut them down. And I think if you're in that situation and you're like, okay, which ones do I need to be focusing on? I guess that could give you some really useful, accurate data to make that decision as well.

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah, absolutely. And I am wholeheartedly somebody who always looks at the data before making any kind of decision. And also. Understanding what a goal is for the business. So predominantly you're probably thinking about sales and therefore driving people to your website. That is probably your first and foremost. Okay. Which social media channel is doing that for me? Um, but then secondary is where am I getting the engagement? So if you imagine you take your top social media channel, that's driving stuff to your website and then your top social media channel, that's getting you engagement. They would probably be the two channels that I would focus on. And you might find that they're the same one.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really useful. Thank you. And if they are the same one, is there any reason not to be on just one? Is there any downside to that?

Amy Atkinson:

No, not really. If you've seen in the numbers that you aren't getting people from, so say, for example, Instagram is the one that's driving people to your website and it's the one that you get the best traffic on, uh, sorry, engagement on. But then you find that perhaps I don't know, 10 percent of your traffic is coming from Facebook. Um, there's literally no harm in just focusing on Instagram. Perhaps Instagram and Facebook is a slightly difficult one because you could technically really easily replicate the content that you're putting on Instagram for Facebook. And then equally, there's no harm in doing that either. Um, but if you're finding that you're creating content for TikTok and Instagram, which are two quite different channels, and then you've got to spend the time putting the things into the TikTok shop then and it's only driving 10 percent of your traffic, which of course you would then expect not all of that to convert. Perhaps that's where you need to think, okay, perhaps it's not worth my time.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really helpful. Thank you. So thinking again about next year. So are there any, and I don't know, you might hate this word. I couldn't think of a better word for it, but are there any trends coming up or I don't know, things that are emerging channels that, or anything at all, that's coming up that we should be, know about or think about when we're planning for next year. So I think Thread's was a good example you mentioned because I think more and more people seem to be jumping on there. I haven't yet.

Amy Atkinson:

No. See this is it. Um, I, with Threads, let's just chat a little bit about Threads. So Threads went absolutely wild in that first two weeks of it launching. And almost, almost almost everyone I know moved onto Threads. Within two weeks, it dropped off almost instantly. So, um, to the point where Adam Mosseri, so he's the CEO of Instagram and Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook, and anyone that doesn't know, Threads is owned by Meta, which owns both Facebook and Instagram. Those CEOs were putting on Threads and they were also putting on their Instagram. What do we need to do? What's missing from Threads? Where have you all gone? They didn't understand why people just basically went over there. They were really loving the hype and then everyone disappeared. So, um, just be wary of Threads, is that they are going to be doing a lot of work to keep driving people there and keep using Threads, but it's, it's almost gone full circle in terms of who's spending time over there. Um, so that's just my thoughts on Threads, but when it comes to trends coming up and we have already kind of talked about it is that people do love to buy things. We are a sucker for buying things. But we don't naturally like to be sold to, we don't like people telling us what we have to buy. Um, so what you'll find with influencers, and this is something to be mindful with your marketing when it comes to products is, you, you won't necessarily find influence nowadays, influencers saying, oh, look at this. Isn't this the most wonderful product that I've ever bought? Um, I've just realized this isn't a video, this is a podcast and I've just shown my Airpods case. Um, so.

Vicki Weinberg:

I could see it.

Amy Atkinson:

So. They won't necessarily show the product. What they will do is show the product, how it works, what they like about it. They might have seen that, they might say that they've seen other people use it and they might quote what those other people have said. So they're literally talking around that product and what, how amazing it is and the benefits. They're talking about the benefits as opposed to what it is necessarily. They're talking about how to use it. And they're basically seamlessly incorporating all of that information into their topics, uh, into their content. And so then it's not like, look at this product, buy it, it's, I'm going to add this product to my link and you can go and buy it, but I absolutely love it. And all the while they're talking about it, they're using it at the same time so that you can see how good it is. And all of this kind of content, which is more user generated. So it's a, somebody using it is key for building up trust. And that is the kind of going to come more and more prevalent in 2024 when people are really thinking about where they should be spending their money.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really helpful. Thank you. And I know exactly what you mean about the influence. I've definitely seen that myself, the way people are talking about things has changed. And I think as well, do you think that's also partly because people are. Or maybe trusting a bit less trusting because we've seen so many ads where people are promoting this and promoting that you've almost thought, well, if you're cynical like me, I often think, well, you're just saying that because you've been paid to, if I'm being really blunt.

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah, exactly. And therefore you don't necessarily believe it. And I think also when it comes to influencers, and I'm going to use an example around teeth whitening. Is that, you know full well that a lot of influencers don't go and buy their at home kit. They probably go and pay a dentist a lot of money to do it in the way that they want it done. And then when they start talking about an at home kit and how amazing it is, straight away you don't believe it because you've probably seen them two weeks ago pop into their dentist because they've tagged their dentist in something, or it could be even, I don't know, hair extensions, for example, they have been to go and get their hair extensions done a month ago, and then suddenly they're using an at home kit. It just, it doesn't sit right, especially when you've got somebody who is an avid follower and they watch what you do day in, day out, they're going to straight away sniff something's not right.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah. And I don't know if this is just me, but I, I definitely. I found myself more, the things I've been buying, I've seen on Instagram recently, haven't been ads. They've been things that have been recommended by people that I follow, not influencers. So people who are really honest about the fact that they don't have affiliate links, they don't push you to buy things. They will say something's been gifted, but generally they're buying things with their own money. So I brought a supplement recently because someone that I follow, that I trust, because I've followed this person for years, they've got a big audience, but they were talking about, oh, I started using the supplement and I'm going to see how it works. And over like the weeks as they were posting about, oh, you know, things that had changed for them as a result, I was just getting more and more drawn in, whereas I'd seen ads from the same brand and I'd seen ads featuring other, I'm putting quotes, real people, but actually what swung it for me was seeing someone that I felt I could relate to a bit more. So someone I've met and know, I don't think you necessarily have to met them, but some, basically someone that I felt I could trust. And I think that, I don't know whether you think, if you, are you seeing that things are moving more towards that so that people want to see more real people, and I'm putting real in air quotes, you know what I mean?

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah, definitely. They definitely.

Vicki Weinberg:

Rather than a celebrity.

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah. Yeah, exactly that. And for, um, any product-based businesses, uh, or even services to a certain extent, if it's a B to C company, um, think about you if you do want to invest in influencers as a strategy. Think about influencers who have probably got 5 to 10, 000 followers as opposed to 50 to 100 to 150, 000 followers because you might find that you'll get a better return on investment, because they're still quite small and a lot of people who do follow them have probably been on that journey with them already, where they've grown from a thousand to 10, 000.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah. That's really useful. Thank you. And I'm glad it's not just me that's getting more and more cynical. But as you said, I think because we're all having to think really carefully about how and where we spend our money, you, you do question things a lot more now. Um, it was also really interesting what you were saying about Threads and part of the reason I wanted to ask you about Threads is because I feel like it can be so easy to think, oh, this is the next big thing. And I'm going to jump on this. And I deliberately didn't get, use Threads because I wanted to see how it played out. And you're right. I didn't realize it was only two weeks, but I noticed there was a lot of people and then it vanished. And because there was another, a few years ago, there was another platform and I've forgotten what it's called. And you might remember it. It was like a thing with rooms. It was like an audio platform and you could join rooms and like have discussions. I can't remember what it's called. I hope someone knows and can tell me.

Amy Atkinson:

I know exactly what, wasn't clubhouse? No.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yes. That was it. It was clubhouse. And I remember that was a big thing and everyone moved on to there and then that sort of moved on. So, uh, because my, my feeling is that we have to be a little bit wary of jumping onto every new thing that comes up. Is that the advice you'd give? I mean, or do you think that actually it's worth giving it a try and seeing how it goes?

Amy Atkinson:

Okay, what would I say about this? I think if you've got the time, if you've got the capacity, there's absolutely no harm in you trying something new. I'm definitely not going to say don't do it, but I would say if you already feel overwhelmed with everything that you've got to do, then just wait, just wait to see if you know your cluster has moved there, if they've moved there, then absolutely go ahead and try it. Um, but I'm just so mindful and careful of advising people to jump on something new when I already know a lot of us feel stretched.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's such great advice. Thank you. And I think it's probably reassuring for everyone to hear you say that because it almost feels like you're missing out if you're not jumping on the latest thing, sometimes it can be harder to not do it. So thank you. Because I think that, I think that's honestly really reassuring and knowing that you can just wait and you don't have to be everywhere day one. You can, yeah, see how things play out first.

Amy Atkinson:

And equally, I think this is where it really helps to know who your ideal customer is, because if you know your ideal customer is a trendsetter, there's someone that will jump on a trend like that. That's when potentially something like this is important to make sure that you're always there. However, if you're somebody, if your ideal customer is more somebody who feels a bit comfortable waiting a little while, perhaps they'll join either at the peak or even as it starts to slowly drop off, that's when you can jump on too. Um, and that's what I know about my customers is that they want to feel they're not going to just jump into the, the next thing straight away because they don't, I know that they don't have the time to do it. So they might sign up, but they don't necessarily get it into their daily routine that they need to be spending time on that. So I don't, I don't, I'm not on Tik Tok. Well, I do have a tick tock, I've signed up, but I don't spend time creating content for that all the time because I know that my customers don't have the time to do it either. So it's just really, I've, I've said this so much in this podcast, but it's just really understanding your customer, like the back of your hand. It's so important.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you. And I don't think it matters how many times you say that, because I think that's key and that's running through everything you've said, whether it's content channels, everything, it just comes back to the customer. So I think that's just, yeah, such a good reminder. Um, okay. So just a few final questions, Amy. So when, so when we're sort of thinking about sitting down, planning out 2024, have you got any other ideas or suggestions of things we could try doing or things we might like to think about while we're thinking about this?

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah. And I know I've said, don't jump on the latest thing. Um, but if you, as you said, as I said, if you, if you do know that your customer is spending time on TikTok now, or even a little bit of time, TikTok really is on the rise. And it's a space where you could potentially grow quite quickly and easily so long as your customer is there. So I would recommend trying it if you know that your customer is there. Um, really think about how you can create user generated content. Um, so do you need to think about spending a little bit of money, either paying small micro influencers, I call them small influencers, um, as part of your marketing strategy, or perhaps they might, you might be able to just gift it. So can you afford to gift any of your new products, old products to these influencers? Um, there are a couple of things that I would consider people looking at for 2024.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's brilliant. Thank you, Amy. And now I've got one final question before we finish up. And, um, this might be, this might be a hard one or it might not be actually. Let's see. Um, what is your number one piece of social media advice be for small product businesses or, or your best tip, however you want to come at this?

Amy Atkinson:

I think. The best tip that I can give you is to be consistent with your posting. And what I mean by that is not constant. I don't necessarily mean all day, every day, because I also understand that that's not possible, but just be consistent. So whether that's consistently posting three times a week, perhaps it is posting every day, or perhaps it's twice a week, just be consistent because the algorithm will pick up on your consistency and it will share your content regularly to people. So definitely do that. And be, I'm giving it's two, but it's, it's kind of one in the same, be consistent on your stories as well.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you, Amy. And I think that's really good advice. And I think what really, I think that all ties back so nicely to the podcast as well, because I think if you. To be consistent, it's obviously going to help if you plan. So nobody wants to get to Monday and think, oh, what are my free posts going to be this week? Whereas if you spent some time in advance thinking, okay, in January, I'm going to be focusing on, I don't know, dry January or the January blues or I'm launching something or whatever it is, it'll make it much easier to plan those posts because I think, yeah, that's where I think it can be harder to keep up, as if you just haven't got a clue what you're posting day to day, week to week.

Amy Atkinson:

Yeah, absolutely. Definitely.

Vicki Weinberg:

Amazing. Well, thank you so much, Amy. So we're all going to go away now and plan on social media for next year. Thank you so much for all you shared. And last question is where can people go and find you?

Amy Atkinson:

So they can find me at the Femtrepreneur on Instagram, on Facebook, and on LinkedIn. And my website is www.theFemtrepreneur.com. And for any of you who are thinking, how on earth do you spell that? If you think entrepreneur, but then just add in FEM before the trepreneur, that should help you.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thanks so much, Amy. And I'll link to everything in the show notes as well. So for anyone who hasn't managed to get that down, um, they'll be able to find you there as well.

Amy Atkinson:

Perfect. Thank you so much for having me.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you so much. Thank you so much for listening right to the end of this episode. Do remember that you can get the full back catalogue and lots of free resources on my website, vickiweinberg. com. Please do remember to rate and review this episode if you've enjoyed it and also share it with a friend who you think might find it useful. Thank you again and see you next week.