Buy my new book – ‘Bring Your Product Idea to Life’

Showing up online is something many of us struggle with. And as product business owners, it can feel easier to hide behind your product. 

Today I had the pleasure of speaking with Helen Williams, a coach and the founder of Hey Helen Williams. Helen helps entrepreneurs to move online and overcome visibility blocks to get seen by the right people and increase their income. 

Today we are looking at something I struggle with myself, putting your face on social media. Many of us find it terrifying, so I wanted to find out why Helen thinks this is something so many of us struggle with and what we can do about it.

We talked about why it is important to show your face online, even as a product business owner,  and, importantly, practical strategies to achieve this in manageable, less intimidating steps. This episode was particularly enlightening for me, and I hope it offers you valuable insights as well.

The Bring Your Product Idea to Life Podcast  – Best Business Podcast Award, Independent Podcast Awards 2023

USEFUL RESOURCES:

Helen’s Website

Helen’s Instagram

LET’S CONNECT

Join my free Facebook group for product makers and creators

Find me on Instagram

Work with me 

Buy My Book: Bring Your Product Idea To Life

If you enjoy this podcast, and you’d like to leave a tip, you can do so here: https://bring-your-product-idea.captivate.fm/support

Transcript
Vicki Weinberg:

Welcome to the Bring Your Product Idea To Life podcast. This is the podcast for you if you're getting started selling products or if you'd like to create your own product to sell. I'm Vicki Weinberg, a product creation coach and Amazon expert. Every week I share friendly practical advice as well as inspirational stories from small businesses. Let's get started. So today on the podcast, I am delighted to speak to Helen Williams. Helen helps entrepreneurs to move online and overcome visibility blocks to get seen by the right people and increase their income. So what Helen and I talk about today basically is getting visible. So we mainly focus our conversation on social media and Helen talks a lot about the importance of putting your face on social media, which I have to be honest, it's something that terrifies me, although I have done it a few times. Speaking to Helen, um, why we need to get more visible and importantly, I think ways that we can get more visible online in really tiny baby steps so it doesn't seem so scary and overwhelming. Um, so I took personally took a lot away from this episode. I really hope you do too, and I would love now to introduce you to Helen. So, hi Helen. Thank you so much for being here.

Helen Williams:

Hi Vicki. Lovely to be here. Thank you.

Vicki Weinberg:

Well, thank you for joining me. Can we please start by you giving introduction to yourself, your business, and what you do?

Helen Williams:

Absolutely. So my name is Helen Williams. So I run a coaching business. So I work predominantly on Instagram. So I coach people who want to set up online and get more visible. So, um, it's kind of two aspects to it. So it's a kind of mindset behind getting visible and the actual practicalities of how our dear friend Instagram actually works and how to get it to work for you.

Vicki Weinberg:

I'm so excited to have this conversation because I am sure I'm not the only person listening who, you know, uses Instagram, but, you know, terrified to put a face on there or, you know, show it too much. I'm sure that you hear this. sort of thing all of the time. And that's actually quite a, maybe a good place to start, Helen. What are some of the sort of common reasons you hear from your clients as to why maybe they're not showing up online and some of, you know, the concerns or fears they might have?

Helen Williams:

Yeah, it's funny. It's usually exactly the same things with the, cause I do work predominantly, predominantly with females and it's usually the things, you know, which we all have going through our heads. So, you know, what do I look like? Like, is my, you know, am I having a bad day? Or just my skin, like it's those, it's those concerns. And it's such a shame because it's stopping that as kind of fear is preventing people from, from doing something that they know will benefit their business and they want to get closer to their audience and show more of themselves. But I think day to day, it's the kind of, I mean, I feel it, I feel it myself. You know, I mean, I've got friends who are like in Dubai and in the States and in lovely places that have the warm weather and it is, it's easier to. To show up, you know, with a, you know, a bit of a tan on your face and a sort of summery top that is when it's gray and dreary in the UK and you do feel a bit like, you know, maybe huddled under a blanket at home or something, it's harder. So, you know, then we all have these kinds of things and, and I'm not sure if it's. you know, sometimes they're excuses, aren't they? It's quite nice sometimes if there's something that's pushing you a bit and you can think, Oh, I won't go live today on Instagram. I won't do a, you know, talking to camera because, and you've got a couple of reasons. Oh, my hair's not looking great or I'm due a haircut soon or something, you know, maybe the little bits of, of that, but it does tend to be. A lot of it is just purely the physical stuff, which of course, nobody, you know, nobody would notice. The people that say things to me, I look at them, I think, are you kidding? Like you look amazing. You know, just, we're so self critical.

Vicki Weinberg:

We are, you're right. And also I'm fairly sure as well that nobody's actually, as you say, judging how we look because I've never watched somebody's. story or live and gone, Oh, I don't like their hair. And I'm sure that's not just me, but I just think as people, we're so much more critical of ourselves and other people are of us. The things we noticed like nobody else probably does.

Helen Williams:

No, I know it's crazy, isn't it? It's um, because as you say, if people were really that offended by the fact that you needed your roots doing or something like that, they, you know, if they, they were that critical, they would, they wouldn't listen to you. You know, you, you tend to. With Instagram, you have choice of who you follow and who you know. Our time is precious, so people aren't gonna, you know, I don't think many people are going to give up their precious time just to, you know, pull someone, pull some poor person apart who's put themselves out there. So, but it, it is just these things in our head, isn't it?

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah. And also I'll be very honest. I don't want the people to watch me. If that's, you know, if people who are going, who are watching just to say, well, your hair doesn't look nice. They're not kind of the people I want to attract and work with anyway, if I'm honest.

Helen Williams:

I know. That's it. Yeah. So you want, you know, obviously people, um. If you're using Instagram for business, you want the people who follow you to be, you know, supporting you and perhaps, you know, work with you. Maybe you'll work with them, whatever that is, but it's a positive union. So yeah, you're right. You don't, you know, if they want to unfollow you, that's amazing. If they're the kind of person who's judgmental about haircut, then good.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah, absolutely. Okay. So we've talked a little bit about why we might, we might be all a bit afraid to get on Instagram and show our faces, but why should we be doing it? What are some of the benefits and the reasons that we should need to be a bit braver?

Helen Williams:

Yeah. So it's, it's such a key thing with Instagram because, um, obviously we see a lot of, a lot of the big brands, you know, you expect in advertising marketing, you expect to see a polished product, you know, but over the years. Where you've had like models and it's very unrelatable and obviously it gives people sort of body, you know, disform, you know, uh, coming with a word, dysmorphic, you know, kind of issues around seeing these perfect models in advertising now, you know, even the big brands are using more relatable models and real, real people. So it's kind of filtering down from a higher level, but particularly with small businesses on Instagram, you know, single, single people who are just running a business like coaching or selling a product, a small, typically a small business. It's, it's so important. People want to see them. They want to see that face. They want to get to know them a little bit, and there's only so much getting to know somebody you can do. Through, I mean, a photo is okay. It's better than just a graphic, for example, you know, but actually hearing somebody's voice, seeing the expressions that, you know, there's a lot that comes across in people's expressions in their face, their mannerisms, their, you know, whether they talk with their hands, whether they get quite excited and sort of show disappointment, there's, there's so much emotion that comes into it. And that is what ultimately people will buy into, because with your product or your service. It's, it's not just that, you know, they, people want to get to know a story behind it. They want to get to know the person behind it. And you can only really do that by layering these kinds of like storytelling and, you know, a bit of your personality, you know, if it's, if it's a product, they want to see how you're using it, you know, because that's, that's really relatable if it is a product and the person is using the product or wearing the product. That's, that's when we automatically as humans kind of see ourselves using that product or wearing that product. If it's, if it's just on a, on a shelf, it's, it's, there's a step, there's a step in between you imagining you've got that product yourself.

Vicki Weinberg:

That makes sense. And I think you're right. I've, I've definitely noticed a shift towards more seeing more, I'm putting real people in air quotes, real people, you know, using products online, which I think is amazing. And even, um, like the whole influencer thing, I'm seeing a lot of what I would consider smaller accounts sharing products that they're working with. So it's not just. How do I say it? It's not just, um, like you say, the models and the people who feel really removed from us.

Helen Williams:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I've noticed, um, I've noticed that recently, actually just, um, sort of scrolling on, on Tik TOK and Instagram, like some of the like sweaty Betty. They're using influencers now and they're, they're not even influencers. I've just done a bit of research on this actually, just because I suddenly noticed Mark and Spencers are doing it sweaty Betty. I'm sure there's others. Um, but it just occurred to me that they're normal people. They're kind of, and as I say, they're not influencers. They're just people like almost trying clothes on just in front of the, you know, the camera. And I've like, Oh, I've just bought this, you know, jumper from Marks and Spencers. It's 22 pounds, but look how amazing it is. You know, just like you might almost, if you were. showing a friend, you know, if it's, if it's a friend that you can't see in person, you might sort of do a video message for them. For example, it's very much got that feel to it. It's very, very friendly and very relatable. And I think that's getting bigger and bigger. That's the UGC, the user generated content of seeing so much more of that.

Vicki Weinberg:

And I think I really like that sort of content. I've seen the same examples. that you're mentioning. And like, as a woman in my forties, I really like seeing other women in their forties, like showing, Oh, I bought this from M& S or whatever, because to me, that's more relatable than a model in their twenties or late teens. If you see what I mean, not saying that I can't wear the same clothes as those people, but I think it's more relatable when you see like a someone who. to you feels more like you.

Helen Williams:

Yeah, absolutely. I know what you mean. Um, because I think there was a, when, when it first started coming in, it was all of a sudden all about sort of plus size models because obviously traditional models were stick thin. And for a lot, a lot of people that was, they couldn't relate to that. So I think that it went the other way. big sort of push on the curvy women and, you know, the larger plus sizes, which again was great. But I think now it's kind of finding a steady pace of just very normal, not the extremes, but just very normal and a really good mixture as well, because I'm, I'm quite naturally thin. Um, so again, if there's like. plus size curvy. I can't really relate to that, you know, so it's quite nice that you've got this mixture so you can see somebody, you know, everyone can sort of find, find one of them that's aspirational that you sort of want to look at without it just being a very polished, airbrushed, you know, model.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah. That makes sense. And also just to build on everything that you've been saying, I was having funny enough a conversation this morning and I have a podcast interview and it was about PR. And in that interview, the lady that I spoke to, and I won't give too much away because obviously that's another episode, but she was talking about the fact that there's research out there that says that people are more likely to buy from brands when they feel like they know the founder, not know them personally, but you know, be able to put a face to the brand or know a bit of the backstory. And apparently this is becoming really important. Now, when people have lots of us, not everyone, but lots of us have a bit less displaceable income and we're thinking about where to spend it. And she was talking about the importance of knowing there's a person behind the brand and how that is actually making people more inclined to buy them from a brand that's maybe more faceless. And so I think that ties in. Really nicely to what we're talking about here as well.

Helen Williams:

Yeah, it does. Yeah. I think, I think there's so much more about that. It's, it's a deeper connection, isn't it? And I don't know if it's like a, just a natural progression after the COVID years, you know, in that we want to get a bit closer, you know, I know much in my sort of field of work with the coaches, you know, there's much more about networking and in person events is, you know, really big people are really craving, you know, I think there's also this kind of um, thought of, you know, particularly because it's the winter now, you know, or I hope that never happens again, you know, lockdown is everyone's worst nightmare that that would ever happen again. So I think people are much more up for getting out there and building relationships in case it sort of got taken away from us ever again. So I think there's just this longing for this kind of deeper connection on, on all levels. And when we're making those buying decisions and absolutely it comes into that as well.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah, I think so. And they'll say, you know, the drive to buy from small businesses as well. So I think lots of us are choosing to buy from small businesses rather than the big corporations. And I think as part of that, I know that I, I remember the brands more when I feel like I know something about them, whether they've been on the podcast, I've spoken to them or whether I've watched a story or heard them on another podcast. I just think it's, you kind of relate to and remember them because there's something. that kind of makes brands stand out a little bit because you can be selling the same products as someone else. So maybe what's different is the founder or is the fact that they give money to charity or whatever, you know, whatever it is. But I think there has to be something, doesn't there, that distinguishes you from other people selling very similar products. Because for lots of us, what we sell might not be a hundred percent unique. There'll be someone who sells a.

Helen Williams:

Yeah, definitely. Yeah, absolutely. I think it's, uh, and it's, it's finding your, it's kind of finding who your people are as well, you know, because like you say, there's people selling the same things and it's like with coaching, you know, there's people coaching the same, the same things, you know, not everyone has a completely unique edge, but what, what it is, they, their personality is their unique edge. So it's, you know, it is like the tone of their voice or perhaps the way they look, it's just something that. people will kind of gravitate towards what, what they like. So the more you show of that, the more chance you have of finding, you know, finding your people.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you, Helen. I think you have convinced everyone that we need to be more visible, whether that's on Instagram or TikTok or wherever we're choosing to be. Um, but how do we do that in a way that's not quite so scary? Because I think if you've gone from, um, filling your grid with Pictures of your products or whatever it is, and you've never done a live or never even maybe done a story with your face on it. This is probably sounding really, really daunting. So what are some easy ways we can get started?

Helen Williams:

Yeah. So really, I think a really nice kind of easy way that I do to encourage my clients to do is just to do a really simple introduction post because. It builds so much, um, so much trust, you know, just, it can be a photo if it, you know, if you want to start kind of small, because obviously photos, you can, you know, choose your best one. And, you know, it's not, not as daunting as a video, um, but just some key facts, you know, and you can, if it's on Instagram, you can run it as a reel, by having this sort of the facts, bullet points kind of coming up to keep the movement flowing because reels do perform really well on Instagram. People like to see something. Um, moving, um, so yeah, just a, you know, flat photo of yourself and just some things that you're interested in or the, you know, the weird things about you, just not too weird, but you know, the things that people will just, you know, maybe your, you know, your favorite, your favorite foods or your pets or just things that you're interested in that kind of, that you like to talk about. Like you might, when you meet a new friend and you're getting to know each other, the kind of things you might share in that conversation, because again, there will be Things that you say, it's like, are you a dog person or a cat person? You know, so it's those kinds of things that if somebody is like a dog person and you're a dog person immediately like, Oh, have you got a dog? You know, it just gives you that, that thing, doesn't it? That next sort of opener for more of a conversation. So I would say every time it's a photo with some, just start, just start sharing a little bit and you'll see, you know, particularly on Instagram, you can, you can kind of say. You know, this is me, blah, blah, blah. And then, um, you know, I'd love to get to know you, you know, a lot better. I mean, I've done that before and, you know, people in the comments then all start to interact with you and say, Oh, I've got a dog as well. And, um, you know, and then they share a bit about themselves and you kind of find out if they're you know, like again, if they're your kind of person just by, just by sharing. So just to, you know, it doesn't have to have to be right. You're going to go live on Instagram on a Saturday morning and all your, you know, maybe all your friends from school or something might be turning up and judging you, you know, those kinds of like big, ah, I'm scared to do it moments. Um, can just be a photo, some music and some key, key bits about you.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really nice. Thank you. I think that's a really great place to start. Um, From there. So particularly with the audience of the podcast is product businesses. How can we continue to share a bit about ourselves online? Because I think when you sell products, it's really easy to not hide behind a product sounds harsh and I don't mean it in that way at all, but to make the focus of your social media very product led. What are some ways other than, um, sort of doing introductory posts that we can kind of get ourselves into that, if that makes sense.

Helen Williams:

Yeah. Yeah. I think it's really good to, um, to start with the story storytelling. So depending on what the product is to start showing videos, because, um, again, it doesn't have to be straight, you know, you talking to camera and sometimes they're not always the best anyway. Sometimes, um. these kind of videos where you just see somebody, you know, using that product, it's that kind of day to day relatability. So, um, yeah, as I said earlier, with that product in your hand, you know, if it, if it's clothing, you know, obviously it's sort of easier, more obvious, I suppose, you know, you wearing those clothes, if it's you know, you, I don't know, kitchen utensils, you know, you're cooking with those it's, it's you using them so that people can see you like you and then imagine themselves using that product as well. And, and then you can kind of layer in that, that kind of storytelling. So what you love about the products, why you started to sell them, you know, just your, your journey. So again, it's not, it's not hard content because it's. You're not making anything up. It is literally your, you know, is literally your story, but not being afraid to, you know, like when, why did you start the company? You know, when did you get founded? What was your journey? Has it been quick, easy? You know, did you intend it to be that way? Um, you know, how did it unfold? I mean, as, cause I'm coming on your show, obviously I've listened to some of, um, some of your previous podcasts. And it's so interesting to, I think there was a guy who's been doing journal and writing journals. Yeah. Um, and it was so interesting because again, if I'd just seen, um, you know, seen the journal, it's, it's a journal it's, you know, whether it's for me or not or for a gift or something, that's it. But to actually hear the story behind it, that really makes you really interested in it. And, and in him and, you know, just, just building those sort of layers and depth to it. So I think the more you can bring that, bring that in and start showing yourself using it and why, you know, why you're using it, you know, pictures of yourself, just bringing it in. It's, it's, um, it just builds up because people, you know, people won't just see something. Well, I suppose they do sometimes, but generally it takes, I think it's like seven times or something for people to see something, be presented with it before they decide to buy. So the more you can do it, it, it just adds in more depth, more depth. And then, you know, that's when people will be like, right, I'm going to, I'm going to purchase. So these different kinds of ways of doing it is quite, I mean, I, I plan my content out. And I think if you, once you kind of get structured in that way, you can consciously. Decide sort of how, you know, it could be one week you're going to focus on how your product benefits like family life or mothers or whatever it is, but try and be more sort of deliberate about how you're, how you're using it.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you so much. And that leads me on really nicely to my next question is like, how often do we need to be showing up? Um, I mean, it's not around how often do we need to be posted on social media, but how often do we need to be visible, um, on

Helen Williams:

Yeah, I mean, I think really because, because of the algorithm, particularly on Instagram, but I guess all social media, um, they don't, you know, it's not like it used to be where everything would get shown to everybody. We only get, you know, drip fed some bits of it. So you're not, you're not going to see everything that somebody is putting out there. So I think sometimes. If you're creating content on Instagram or social media, it can feel that you're perhaps talking about the same thing all the time, but you know, you do need to because repetition is, is king. So it's like, you know, the more people hear it, it sinks in. So I think, I mean, It shouldn't, it shouldn't overtake your, you know, if you're, if you're all day putting content out, cause it can be very time consuming. Um, I think you need to find something that fits, fits with your, your lifestyle and, you know, doing other things as well. But I, I think really, I mean, I try and go for like three to five. Kind of decent reels or decent pieces of content and then stories on Instagram are like so important because that's the real quick bits, which, um, people love to just tap, tap, tap across stories. It's all, you know, this, this is it. Social media and TikTok is so popular because it's such quick form. It's, you know, it's just really quick turnaround, isn't it? You just tap and you just swipe or whatever it is onto the next one very quickly. So I think it's a key to like not overthinking it, just. Just getting out there and getting more familiar with thinking it's, it's not a really massive deal. You know, it's like people aren't going to be analyzing your content, like you're analyzing it. They're going to either like it and swipe on, or, you know, it's, it's a very quick decision. So the more, the more you do it, the better, the more chance you've got people actually seeing and connecting with you.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really helpful. Thank you. And in terms of stories, I mean, for stories again, do you recommend that people show their faces or is it enough to show a bit of your life and what you're doing? Um, because I feel, I feel like, again, lots of us now, I think I'm, I'm including myself in this, I'm much more comfortable with stories and quick photos of I'm doing this or that. Um, but there's still the barrier about actually You know, maybe going live on stories or showing your face on stories. I see a lot less of that, if I'm honest, and I look at stories all the time, because as you say, it's great to just tap through and see what everyone's up to. Um, is stories another place where we should actually be showing ourselves, our faces?

Helen Williams:

Yeah. I mean, stories, that's one of the things that I will always try and get people to do is one of the first steps because stories only last 24 hours and then they disappear unless you put them in your highlights on Instagram. They're gone forever. So it's quite a nice mentally, you know, it's not like you think it's going to be on your Instagram grid and people can see you talking for, You know, forevermore, it's sort of set in stone stories that it's just, again, it's just throw away. And, you know, I think 30, I think it's 30 seconds or has it gone up to 90 seconds? It's still quite short if you were going to talk to camera. So if people don't like what you're saying, they'll just tap on to the next bit. So it's again, just, um, I find it quite easy talking to them. I find it easier talking to them on my stories because I know that it's so quick. And I know people will just tap on if they're not interested in it. And if they are interested, they'll, they'll listen. So it feels, it feels less like you're taking up space, you know, like I'm, I'm like uber polite. I hate to sort of think I've taken up too much space or too much time. That's something I'm always kind of like working on. But with stories, it doesn't feel so intrusive. It is very much like. Yeah, you've just got, you've got a platform to talk for, you know, a minute, a minute and a half, um, and people will listen if they're interested in what you've got to say. And you can, it's, it's really important to put, um, subtitles onto Instagram stories as well, because a lot of people think research has been done that most people listen to stories. Um, without the sound on. So you need to have captions, captions on there. I think it's a sort of first thing in the morning or at nighttime kind of scrolling, scrolling in bed things. So someone's just talking, but without captions, you're, uh, you're going to miss out.

Vicki Weinberg:

Well, that's used, that's used. I'm thinking about it. You're right. I almost never have sound on for stories and I will swipe through something without subtitles. Is there an easy way to add those? Sorry to ask a technical question.

Helen Williams:

Oh yeah, no, it's really easy. So at the top you have like stickers, um, and text, so you can add your own text and links and all like hashtags and things like that. It's just, it's under the stickers one, I think actually, um, it's just one of those options there and there's a caption, so it will just translate it and you can very easily just change, change the font and size and color. It's all very customizable. So it's, and they look good, you know, it's nice. It's a, it's a nice looking piece of content, you know, just you talking to the camera about something, you could put a link to a product there, whereas you can't do that in a reel or a post on Instagram. You can only use the bio. So that's a nice feature as well.

Vicki Weinberg:

Oh, you know, I really didn't know. So you can see how little I talk to camera. I really didn't know that you could add captions from within Instagram. I thought it was because it used to be the case. You had to record your videos, didn't you? And then you had to add them in and then you had to. Yeah. Wow. I think that's. Hopefully, I mean that to be honest will make me more likely to do videos, the fact that I don't have to go through all these steps. So hopefully that's really useful to anyone else who didn't realize that was there.

Helen Williams:

Yeah. It's a really quick, easy way to just, as I said, like without overthinking it. Cause if you, you know, if you are having a bad head, you can put. You can put a filter on as well. You know, you can put a nice black and white, black and white is quite flattering. I find normally, and it looks quite nice. You can have a colored text on it. You know, it's quite quick and easy just to, you know, just to get your face up there. And as I said, like it's so quick and 24 hours it's gone. So, you know, it's, it's not, it's not one to overthink. It's just nice to jump on, say a few words and, uh, yeah, they're really effective.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really useful. Thank you. So as well as talking about sort of ourselves and how we maybe found the stories and how and why we use products, is there anything else that product businesses in particular could be sharing?

Helen Williams:

Um, I think really it's just that like building up the story, showing that their backstory, showing a bit about them and, and their products and how they use it. And even, um, You know, like kind of comparing it to coaching it, but like success stories. So, you know, talking about customers who have bought that product and, you know, why people are buying it, maybe sales trends as well. Just giving people a bit more depth behind the product and the, you know, whichever sort of area it's in, um, that there's so much you can. If people are interested in what you're selling, they'll want to know that stuff. And again, if they're not, that's fine. They can, you know, they can unsubscribe or whatever, but the ones who are interested, you know, there's, there's a lot they can kind of build up if there's a sort of heritage to your brand, or if it's a family business. You know, there's some, again, some really nice techniques you can use just to, um, like with, with the stories again, that can be your sort of behind the scenes. So you can almost have your, you know, your grid as your sort of official, um, posts, but then the people who are really interested will be clicking through your stories. And you know, with Instagram stories, you can see who's. We've been looking at them. So that's really nice as well. You don't get that on Instagram, obviously, you know, how many views your reels have had, you can get insights, but on the stories, you can actually see the people that are looking. So when you see those names, um, you, you get your kind of people that are looking every day. You know that they're people that are actually interested. So it gives you a kind of hot, hot buyers list as well, which is really good.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah, that's right. I hadn't thought of that. That's really useful. Thank you. And I also really like just coming back to something you said a while ago, but I didn't want to not, um, acknowledge this. I really like what you said about the fact that not everyone sees everything and it's okay to be repetitive, because I think that's another concern. It's something that definitely I have, and I'm sure I'm not the only one, where I feel like, oh, I said this a few weeks ago, or I'm always saying the same thing. I'm always, bagging on about the same old topics. So it's really nice to hear you say that actually most people aren't going to see everything you post. And so it's okay to, because I think all of us are only going to have so many things we can talk about. Um, so that's really nice to hear that we can just keep putting out the same messages and surely there must be a benefit as well. I'm talking almost to myself here about being, you know, having a consistent message. I think. If I think as a consumer, I think I would rather see someone talk about the same messages over and over than feel like actually they change what they're about every couple of months, because that's actually quite confusing and doesn't really build much trust.

Helen Williams:

Yes, exactly. It's, it's coming, it's building, um, it's building your name as the expert. So. It's if you're, if you are talking about a particular thing, as long as you, as long as it's not exactly the same, you know, as long as you up slightly, um, but yeah, if people aren't, people won't see it and think, Oh, she's like you said, sort of banging on about the same thing or be like, Oh, she's the expert because she's talking about that again, but she's added a bit more depth or she's added, you know, this it's, it's like, Oh, there's that person talking about that thing, and then that's how you become the sort of go to person for that thing that you're talking about. So it's, it is really important to, to, to stop thinking that you're boring or talking about the same thing because that's, that's you projecting that it's not actually how the consumer will be viewing it.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you. That's really good. That's really good to hear that as well, Helen. And I guess my final few questions, thank you so much for all you've shared so far is, have you got any advice for, um, how you can sort of appear more confident online, perhaps even if you're, even if you're not?

Helen Williams:

Yeah. Um, Yeah, definitely. There's a whole, I mean, really with, with sort of going, you know, either going live or showing your face, you know, kind of talking to the camera. It is one of those things, like most things in life, the more you do it, the easier it will become. And you, you get sort of used to hearing your own voice. Don't you get used to sort of saying the, like saying the same things effectively, because that's what we were just talking about what you need to do, but there's, there's lots of different ways. So, um, Because Facebook you know, very similar. Facebook has like Facebook groups. So you can set up a private group and not give anyone else access to it. So it's only you in it and you can go live in that group and it saves it so you can watch it back. So that's a really nice like practice. area to do it. You know, you can actually, actually go live. You feel that kind of almost that adrenaline surge of, Oh my gosh, I'm live. Um, but no, no, one's going to see it, you know, and then, and then you can do those. And then if it, if it did go well, you can then put it public, you know, so people can see it, but it's really, it's really is just practicing. Um, I mean, there's, there's also There's an app called Captions, um, which has this AI feature on it where you can be looking, you could effectively be reading a piece of piece of paper or have some notes. As long as you've got your face kind of more or less face on, your eyes can be going over to the side and it will, it will put your eyes back to the front.

Vicki Weinberg:

That makes sense. That's clever.

Helen Williams:

As you move, and it's really, it's very, very good. Um, so there's, you know, there's things you can do if you're worried, because I think that's another concern people have is they're going to start talking and like lose this thread or, you know, forget or not sort of give some of the key messages out. So it's, you know, there's ways of getting around that, you know, or you can just have a piece of paper and glance down occasionally. You don't have to be staring right into the camera all the time. It's quite anyway. So, um, or actually another one I've, um, I really like is if you. Either get someone to interview you or pretend someone's interviewing you. So you're looking off camera as if somebody's just asking you these questions. You can always say, you know, like repeat it back to yourself and then answer it. That's quite a nice way to just break up the kind of sitting, the pressure of sort of sitting you looking down the camera. So there's different ways, but it's just really doing it and getting, getting more comfortable with it. And then you'll start to get feedback from people. And that gives you the confidence to do it more.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really helpful. Thank you. Really, really helpful. And I really like the thing about the camera because I always struggle with knowing where to look. Like, do we look just intently down the lens or do you look just to the side of it? And I've spent way too much time thinking about how my eyes look and where they're pointing, which is really silly. But I think we all have these really small. that are possibly a bit silly things. Um, but it just comes back to the excuses we were talking about at the beginning, I think.

Helen Williams:

Yeah, it does. But you know, if you see interviews that we watch on the television or podcast, you know, diary of CEO podcast, you know, when you actually watch it. They're not looking at the camera, they're having a conversation and you're, you know, your list, you're listening and watching it. It's not somebody just sitting there, like, as I said, staring down the camera. So it's quite a nice, um, you know, kind of breaks it up, doesn't it? And it's, it's maybe not as salesy as well, because you feel, you feel like you are listening in, you know, you're listening it to get something from it, to get some knowledge from it, or to learn more about a product. So that's another kind of nice way without having to sit there with this sort of old fashioned kind of, you know, big advertisement to sell, sell, sell. It's, it's just trying to make it a bit more friendly and a bit more, um, approachable.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really useful. Thank you. And thank you for everything you shared Helen. I have just one more question. I promise this really is the last one. What would your number piece of number one piece of advice be for anyone who wants to show up a bit more online?

Helen Williams:

So the number, yeah, number one piece of advice would be To not overthink it, just have a rough, you know, have a rough idea of your purpose, what you want to talk about, if it's a particular thing you're pushing or trying to sell at a particular time, obviously have that as your guide. You know, you always need to have a purpose. I think sometimes people go live on Instagram and you, if you don't know what they're talking about on the purpose, that's when I sort of switch off. So it's good to know what somebody is talking about. But, um, yeah, just, just do it, you know, just start doing it because no, every, everybody, even the big, you know, the big hitters, like if we're talking about Stephen Bartlett, you know, he, he would've had a first podcast. He probably looks back and cringes on it now. I'm sure, you know, you yourself, when you look back at your earlier ones, you wish, you know, you may have done them a bit differently. Um, but over the, you know, over the time things perfect themselves, you know, you reflect on what you like and what you didn't like, then no one is going to turn up with their first time, you know, their first video, getting their face out there and, and it's a hundred percent perfect, but unless you have that first time, you're not going to have your hundredth one that was perfect. So it's just getting started. And, um, you know, you don't even have to watch them back to you. It's kind of, that's why stories are quite nice. You're never going to see them again. So, you know, if you fluff your words, no one else would have noticed. And, um, you know, just don't, don't let these things prevent you from doing it because you're, you know, you're. you're preventing your potential clients or getting your product or your service, you know, that that's why you're there. You're providing a service or a product to someone and they, they need it and they want to hear, you know, they want to hear from you. So yeah, get out there and do it and quit the excuses.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really good advice. Thank you so much, Helen. I really like what you said as well about lots of over thinking it. And actually I will let everyone into a secret that I stopped fairly early on listening back to podcast episodes after I've recorded, I'd recorded them because I found that when I. first got started and I would then, you know, I would record an episode and then I used to listen to it back. I used to be so critical. And in the end I just thought this is not doing me any good. If anything, it's just slowing down the process. Um, I'm actually just going to stop. And now I never listened back to a single way. I mean, obviously I have someone who edits it and takes out any mistakes, but I personally do not listen because I think if I did, it would be just another barrier, another way for me to criticize myself or, um, and that's not to say that I don't want to get better, but I feel you get better by doing and not just by overanalyzing. So if that's helpful for anybody, I think there's a lot to be said for just doing it and then moving on. Yes. So post your video and then just almost forget that you've done it almost, I think that works for me anyway. That may not be the thing for everyone, but I find that if I don't think so much about what I've done, if I do it. You know, have some thought beforehand, obviously, but then afterwards, just almost put it out of your mind. It becomes a lot less scary.

Helen Williams:

It does. Yeah. Cause you, you immediately sort of take that pressure off, don't you, by granting yourself that permission almost to, to just do it without having to go back over it because you'd probably end up deleting stuff or not publishing stuff if you were. if you were so hypercritical of it. Um, so yeah, it's just, it's just doing it, isn't it? Getting it out there. And as you say, the more you hear yourself talking, that is, you don't have to listen to it back and pick holes in it because you wouldn't naturally do that in a conversation anyway. You know, we have conversations with our friends and we just speak, don't we? And then the conversation's over and, and that's it. So it's kind of applying that just living, you know, being in the moment with it, with that message and, um, not, not picking it apart afterwards. Nobody, nobody would. Nobody else would do that. Like you said, you know, going back to the beginning, nobody else is going to look at something and pick it apart. They're just interested in hearing what you've got to say and, you know, what you're teaching them or showing them.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you so much, Helen. And thank, I really think, honestly think that's so reassuring, you know, to hear you talk. And I think you've definitely taken a lot of the fear out of it.

Helen Williams:

Oh good, good.

Vicki Weinberg:

And given some really nice suggestions. Yeah, and I really like the suggestions given for people to get started as well. So I really hope to see lots of you more visible online after this and myself included, I could definitely put my face out there a bit more. So yeah, well, let's do that. Yeah. Well, I think it's, it's the time to do it. I think it's needed. Like people want it from us as service and product providers.

Helen Williams:

So, um, it's, it's just. Becoming comfortable, finding a way that you can do it that doesn't feel too daunting and, um, and just doing it and enjoying it. You know, it's, it's nice. It's building those relationships and, you know, that's what it's all about.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you so much, Helen.

Helen Williams:

You're welcome. Thank you.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you so much for listening right to the end of this episode. Do you remember that you can get the full back catalog and lots of free resources on my website, vickyweinberg. com. Please do remember to rate and review this episode if you've enjoyed it and also share it with a friend who you think might find it useful. Thank you again and see you next week.